Weekend Faves (April 5)

One Big Happy by Rick Detorie
One Big Happy by Rick Detorie

Some things never change.

--Julie

 

 

Doonesbury by Garry Trudeau
Doonesbury by Garry Trudeau

Well played, Mr. Slackmeyer.
--Lucas

 

Wrong Hands by John Atkinson
Wrong Hands by John Atkinson

Well, if you need new pants anyway, you might as well make it two ...

--Elizabeth

 

Freshly Squeezed by Ed Stein
Freshly Squeezed by Ed Stein

There's a child in all of us.

--Julie

 

The Doozies by Tom Gammill
The Doozies by Tom Gammill

This is almost spooky ... just replace jelly beans with cake, and you have my Sunday night.

--Elizabeth

 

The Duplex by Glenn McCoy
The Duplex by Glenn McCoy

A surprise Easter egg hunt! Lucky Eno.

--Julie

 

And, finally, a double dose of hilarious Easter inversions:

 

FoxTrot by Bill Amend
FoxTrot by Bill Amend

 

Real Life Adventures by Gary Wise and Lance Aldrich
Real Life Adventures by Gary Wise and Lance Aldrich

--Lucas





An Easter Basket Full of Comics

It’s the time of year for Easter egg hunts, chocolate eggs and rabbits galore.  

 

From run-ins with strange-looking Easter bunnies to sugar overloads, our GoComics characters have experienced it all.

 

 

FoxTrot by Bill Amend
FoxTrot by Bill Amend

 

Herb and Jamaal by Stephen Bentley
Herb and Jamaal by Stephen Bentley


 

 Buni by Ryan Pagelow
Buni by Ryan Pagelow

 

We’ve created a basket filled to the brim with our favorite Easter-related comics. See them here!





Happy 20th Anniversary, Reality Check!

Today (April 5) marks the 20th anniversary of Dave Whamond’s Reality Check. Kendra Phipps, Reality Check editor, chimes in to honor the anniversary.

 

HEY EVERYBODY! YOU SHOULD TOTALLY CHECK OUT REALITY CHECK BECAUSE IT’S REALLY GOOD!!

 

Gah, sorry. Forgot to use my “inside font.”

 

Reality Check by Dave Whamond

 

But seriously: Reality Check is really funny, and it’s turning 20. (And that rhymes if you pronounce “20” as “twunny,” as God intended.)

 

I’ve been editing Dave Whamond’s Reality Check in some capacity for about three years now. As a comics editor — a job that I still can’t believe I get to do — I enjoy all the strips that cross my desk, but I can’t deny that I play favorites. And Reality Check never ends up on the “to read later” pile.

 

Panel strips like Reality Check are perennially popular for a few reasons. They're super accessible for new readers, with no recurring characters or storylines to keep track of, and so short that you get your hit of funny as quickly as possible. Dave has mastered this short-and-sweet format. Observe:

 

Couch forts rule, and that’s all there is to it.

 

Reality Check by Dave Whamond

 

One for my fellow ‘90s kids:

 

Reality Check by Dave Whamond

 

Facebook jokes!

 

Reality Check by Dave Whamond

 

 

And now, this fabulous panel is celebrating 20 years of bringing the funny. To commemorate this milestone, stay tuned to the GoComics blog all month long for a Reality Check-themed giveaway and a “Meet Your Creator” installment from Dave Whamond.

 

PLUS! You have the opportunity to ask Whamond your most pressing questions! GoComics will host a one-hour live Q&A session on Twitter. The Twitter session will take place on Fri., April 17 at 1:30 p.m. CT. Fans can submit questions to and follow the conversation using the hashtag #AskDaveWhamond.  

 

Be sure to add Reality Check to your GoComics page, so you don’t miss any of the Whamond-y goodness. Dave has been nominated for a Reuben for Reality Check, in addition to numerous other awards and accolades for his cartooning and illustration work. 

 

You can also follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveWhamond. Send him a tweet congratulating him on 20 years! Just think: One more year, and Reality Check will be old enough to enjoy a “Frozen” daiquiri. 

 

Sing it, Elsa.

 

Reality Check by Dave Whamond

 

-Kendra

 

Read Reality Check from the early days here.

 





Meet Your Creator: Dana Summers (Bound and Gagged, The Middletons, editorial cartoonist)

MIDDLETONSmine 1-18585

 

When I started drawing at age 5 or 6, it was no surprise. Art runs in my family. My mother, in addition to being a pianist, was also a singer and a painter, mostly oils. My grandmother and all my aunts played piano and painted. My uncle played guitar and drums, and my grandfather was in a drum and fife group. I got my sense of humor from my father, who was a firefighter in our town, North Andover, Massachusetts. I’d like to share some of his wisdom, but I’m sure some kids will read this. One incident I remember involved him telling off one of my grammar school teachers, a nun. When word got around, kids would say, “You think your old man is tough? Summers’ dad told off a nun!”

 

The first thing I remember drawing is a bathtub. I was at my grandmother’s house. I’ve no idea why I picked such a boring subject. Later, "The Flintstones" comic books were my teaching manuals.

 

My mother, at this time, was no fan of cartoons. I think she considered them the lowest art form … maybe just above restroom graffiti. In grammar school, I drew hot rods on T-shirts, grotesque monsters with gigantic gearshifts and smoking exhaust pipes spewing dust and debris. I charged 50 cents per drawing. I used markers, which quickly faded and afforded me the opportunity to "touch up" shirts for another 25 cents. In high school, I spent hours in detention for drawing during classes like algebra and chemistry. Many of us cartoonist had teachers tell us, “You can’t draw your way through life.” Drawing was something I could get lost in, which was good, since my temper had gained a reputation. I was thrown off both the freshman football team and the freshman basketball team. I didn’t just have a smart mouth, it was Mensa material.

 

I never got into the superhero comics. Although I admired the artwork, I didn’t appreciate the anatomy involved until I attended The Art Institute of Boston and took life drawing. No male students ever missed that class. Where else could you stare at nude models and not get into trouble? I used to sneak in a friend, a guy who was attending broadcast school across town. “He’s thinking of transferring here,” I’d tell the instructor, Mr. Lidbergh. Most of the girls were drug addicts, but, hey, a naked woman was a naked woman. During this time I made money playing guitar and singing in a rock band. We played gigs at clubs and frat houses around Massachusetts … fifty bucks a night and all the beer you could drink. That’s how I met my wife.

 

The Art Institute had no cartooning courses, so I went the advertising design route. I incorporated cartoons into all of my assignments.

 

When I graduated, I spent a few years banging around print shops doing all kinds of art, but to my mother’s horror, I longed to draw cartoons full-time. Then I got a job filling orders in a warehouse freezer, 15 degrees below zero and all the frozen cupcakes you could steal. This job spurred me on to seek better things in life. Not that the Teamsters union hadn’t taken care of me, but I needed to move into an art job.

 

By then, I was married with one daughter. I took a job in North Carolina as a staff artist at the now-defunct Fayetteville Times. I did story illustrations, lettering, promos -- you name it. I could do all the editorial cartoons I wanted as long as my other art was finished. The very first political cartoon I drew there ticked off the entire city of Lumberton. I knew then that drawing cartoons could be dangerous.

 

After four years in North Carolina, I went to the now-defunct Dayton Journal-Herald. I found out for real that cartooning could be dangerous when a whacked-out reader took exception to my views and promised he’d kill me. The cops put a tap on my phone and watched my kids at school. Mike Peters was in the same building drawing for the Dayton Daily News. Mike and his wife Marion were great friends to us, the newbies, and even babysat our kids. But the writing wasn’t only on the pages of the paper, it was on the wall. The Journal-Herald was going downhill fast. And the nutcase was still out there.

 

One day I got a call from Ralph Dunagin in Orlando, Florida. The Orlando Sentinel was looking for a full-time editorial cartoonist. Ralph, who had been doing Dunagin’s People for years was moving to the op-ed page. While in high school, I’d read Dunagin’s People every Sunday in our local paper. I got the job and wound up working with one of my idols for the next 20 years. As one editor put it, “Ralph’s captions are as smooth as silk.” And they were. I got a Ph.D. in caption-writing from Ralph. When he started The Middletons comic strip, he brought me in as a partner. The Middletons has been steady for 30-plus years, and was one of the first strips with an integrated cast.

 

MIDDLETONS-BOUND & GAGGE041

 

One paper in South Carolina was threatened by the Klan for running it. Not long after that, I started my own strip, Bound & Gagged. That strip has been steady for at least 25 years. Ralph recently retired, and now I draw both, plus four or five editorials per week. The deadlines are killer. And Ralph always said,  “The drawing gets easier, but the ideas? Forget it.”

 

BOUND&GAGGED 11-9327

Over the years, I’ve been fortunate to win some awards, meet interesting and sleazy politicians, and even go to the White House for lunch with President George H.W. Bush. I’ve drawn presidents Nixon, Ford, Reagan, Clinton, Bush I, Bush II, Obama, plus various scoundrels, governors, mayors and congressmen and congresswomen. I’ve been told off by readers and scolded by senators. I’ve had personal correspondence from a secretary of state, a Supreme Court justice, an admiral in the navy and a couple governors of Florida.

 

The cartoon that got the most reaction was one I drew of the space shuttle Challenger after it exploded. Ralph and I were invited to sign copies at The Kennedy Space Center. The line was out the door. We toured the Vehicle Assembly Building where the shuttle Discovery was under construction. The Orlando Sentinel printed thousands of copies of the cartoon to give away. Our lobby was jammed for days afterward. To this day, I have people contacting me for copies.

 

In my opinion, political correctness is slowly killing cartoons … no more fat jokes, mother-in-law jokes, explorers-in-the-pot jokes; no more jokes that even remotely involve firearms, even pop guns. Any joke about bad eyesight, any joke that has a character resembling a mafia don -- don’t want to offend Italians after all… any joke involving Indians, smoke signals, peace pipes, any ethnic joke at all, no matter how tame. Soon cartoons will be nothing but bland illustrations… inoffensive and boring. Newspapers are scared to death to lose even one reader.

 

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Two years ago, after 30 years at The Sentinel, I was downsized out. I still work for Tribune Content Agency in Chicago, doing the strips and my editorials. I’ve also been working on a novel for the past five years. An agent in New York is taking a look at it, so we’ll see about that.

 

Stay tuned.

 

Read The Middletons here, Bound and Gagged here or Summers’ editorial cartoons here.





Twitter Q&A with Don Wimmer of Rose is Rose

RisR_3

 

Many thanks to Don Wimmer for joining us for live Twitter Q&A! If you missed out on this week's chat, catch up below:

 

 

Subscribe to Rose is Rose

 

Next week, we'll be joined by Ruben Bolling (Alien Invasion in My BackyardTom the Dancing BugSuper-Fun-Pak Comix). Join us on Friday, April 10 at 1:30pm CST. Follow along using the hashtag: #AskRubenBolling





We Believe in Unicorns, and We’re Not Alone!

Phoebe_spot

 

Have you heard the news? On Mon., March 30, a precocious little girl and her unicorn best friend jumped onto the funny pages of more than 100 newspapers worldwide.

 

We’re not the only ones buzzing with excitement about the sparkly, magical world of Phoebe and Her Unicorn launching in newspapers. Creator Dana Simpson and her comic strip have been the subject of many articles this week, and we want to share a few of them with you!

 

“It's only 10 a.m. on a Monday in Auburn, Wash., but cartoonist Dana Simpson is already on her second interview of the morning. It's the price of success, but Simpson is happy to pay it — even if it's come a little abruptly, and a little late.” – via NorthJersey.com

 

“That Universal Uclick found more than 100 publications to carry Dana Simpson's Phoebe And Her Unicorn marks me as worth noting for a few reasons. One, that's an excellent launch, just by sheer numbers one of the best in that company's history. Two, I believe there's an historical aspect that hasn't been made part of how the strip has been presented, and I'll respect that here, although I'm thrilled by what that represents.” – via The Comics Reporter 

 

“From Marigold and Phoebe’s relationship, she hopes people will see 'the value of friends who you don’t have to change yourself for; the value of friends who will just accept you for you. … Phoebe gets to just be entirely herself, and Marigold sometimes makes fun of her for it but doesn’t really ever judge her for it.'” – via NewsOK 

 

“Marigold Heavenly Nostrils is nothing like 'My Little Pony,' and fans of Dana Simpson love it. The self-absorbed unicorn is one of two characters at the heart of Simpson’s popular comic 'Phoebe and Her Unicorn,' a story about 9-year-old Phoebe and her one-horned best friend.” – via Los Angeles Daily News 

 

“'Unicorns are everywhere,' [Dana Simpson] said. 'Maybe not literal unicorns, but you never know what’s around the next corner that will change your life completely.'” – via Deseret News 

 

Learn more about Phoebe and Her Unicorn’s newspaper launch, or read Phoebe and Her Unicorn here.





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.

 

We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

Promises Promises  3-31-15

 

 

 

Tough Town  3-31-15

 

 

 

 

4-1-15

 

 

 

 

Cleo and Company  4-1-15

 

 

 

Lili and Derek  4-1-15

 

 

 

Mindframe  4-1-15

 

 

 

 

4-2-15

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 
 




Congratulations, Reuben Award Nominees!

National Cartoonists Society
Credit: National Cartoonists Society

 

We’re shouting from the rooftop loud and proud -- GoComics is home to a whole bunch of talented cartoonists!

 

Recognizing the year’s outstanding achievements in all walks of cartooning, the National Cartoonist Society has announced the nominees for the 2014 Division Awards, or the “Silver Reubens.”

 

Several of our amazing GoComics creators have received nominations!

 

Editorial Cartoons

Clay Bennett

Michael Ramirez

Jen Sorensen

 

Newspaper Panels

Dave Blazek (Loose Parts)

Mark Parisi (Off the Mark)

 

Newspaper Comic Strips

Brian Bassett (Red and Rover)

Stephan Pastis (Pearls Before Swine)

Glenn McCoy (The Duplex)

 

Online – Short Form

Jonathon Lemon (Rabbits Against Magic)

Rich Powell (Wide Open)

 

Advertising/Product Illustration

Kevin Kallaugher

Dave Whamond (Reality Check)

 

Greeting Cards

Glenn McCoy (The Flying McCoys, The Duplex, editorial cartoonist)

Gary McCoy (The Flying McCoys)

Maria Scrivan (Half Full)

 

The winners will be announced on Sat., May 23 at the NCS Reuben Awards dinner in Washington D.C. To learn more, visit reuben.org.

 

Congratulations to all of our GoComics nominees! We’re rooting for you!





Spring!

Many of us have long been awaiting the early signs of spring. We’ve anticipated trading parkas for raincoats, opening the windows to let in that fresh spring breeze and for that wet, cold abomination known as “snow” to become nothing but a distant memory. April has finally arrived and brought with it the changing of seasons; the world outside is coming alive, and spring is officially in the air.

 

I often feel that spring is underappreciated. To many people, spring simply serves as a placeholder between winter and summer, not as an important season. But in my opinion, spring is the greatest season of all! It seems like we have to wait an extra long time every year for spring to show its face – if you’re like me, you’re ready for spring to get here as soon as Christmas is over – but when it finally does, there’s no arguing that the result is magical.

 

To illustrate this magic, I’ve compiled some of my favorite springy comics, which show all of the wonderful things there are to love about spring.

 

1. Spring is the season of flying kites (or attempting to). 

 

Cul de Sac by Richard Thompson
Cul de Sac by Richard Thompson

 

2. The chance to garden again … and celebrating that however you see fit. 

 

Garfield by Jim Davis
Garfield by Jim Davis

 

3. Rainy days …

 

Red and Rover by Brian Basset
Red and Rover by Brian Basset

 

… Which, more importantly, lead to puddle jumping!

 

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

4. An end to being teased by Spring Training; MLB Opening Day is finally upon us!

 

Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce
Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce

 

5. The majestic smells of nature return.

 

Adam@Home by Rob Harrell
Adam@Home by Rob Harrell

 

6. Our favorite furry friends come out of hibernation.

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

Now that you’ve seen the beauty of spring through the eyes of our GoComics characters, there’s no denying its magic! So, what are you waiting for? Get outside and enjoy it already!

 

– Amanda





Giveaway: Phoebe and Her Unicorn Prize Pack

PhoebeAndHerUnicornPrizePack

 

Phoebe and Her Unicorn made its debut in more than 100 newspapers earlier this week! We couldn’t be more excited for creator Dana Simpson!

 

To add some sparkle to your life and celebrate this huge accomplishment, we’re giving away two Phoebe and Her Unicorn prize packs, which include:

            - an archive-quality, SIGNED print

            - “Phoebe and Her Unicorn” by Dana Simpson

 

We will randomly select TWO winners.

 

To enter, leave a comment on this blog post and include your FIRST and LAST names. This contest will end Tues., April 7 at 10 a.m. CT. The winners will be announced that day on this blog. Sorry, worldwide comics fans -- this contest is open U.S. and Canada residents only.

 

Can’t wait to see if you win? Order a copy of “Phoebe and Her Unicorn” here.





GoComics Adds Five New Comics March

Spring has arrived and brought FIVE new comics with it! Catch up below on our newest additions.

 

Wrong Hands by John Atkinson

 

Wrong Hands by John Atkinson

Wrong Hands is a single-panel cartoon covering everything from anthropology, bananas and calculus to xenophobia, yams and zeppelins…with a healthy dose of word play thrown in.

Wrong Hands creator John Atkinson has a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree and has been working as a freelance graphic designer for…ever. Born and raised in Ottawa, Canada, he hopes to one day time travel to do it all over again – except this time bring more sandwiches.

 

Read Wrong Hands here.

 

The Norm 4.0 by Michael Jantze

 

The Norm 4.0 by Michael Jantze

The Norm 4.0 comic is about "the boy who DID grow up." Even though there are now four of them, Norm is still trying to figure it all out before his two kids grow up and he and his wife, Reine (French for queen), grow too old. Married with kids, dogs, parents, friends and work? Yep, that’s now the norm. 

 

The Norm 4.0 creator Michael Jantze is an animation director and cartoonist, best known as the author of the syndicated newspaper comic strip The Norm. Jantze studied film in Los Angeles, then worked as a newspaper graphics editor and a visual effects art director at ILM, while writing comic strips. He taught animation and sequential art at the Savannah College of Art and Design from 2009 to 2013. For the last 10 years, Jantze has been writing and directing short-form animation for new media projects, first for Jantze Studios and now for Cengage Learning, Inc.

 

Born in Middletown, New York, Jantze grew up in Normal, Illinois, and now lives in the San Francisco Bay Area.

 

Read The Norm 4.0 here.

 

Up and Out by Jeremy Kaye

 

Up and Out by Jeremy Kaye

Up and Out is a gag strip about the world we live in, and let's face it: It's a really, really weird place. Sometimes surreal, always fantastic, this is a one-of-a-kind strip we're dealing with here.

 

Up and Out creator Jeremy Kaye is a BFA graduate from the Savannah College of Art and Design (2010). Feeling the need to break free from a string of mind-numbing day jobs, Kaye began Up and Out in 2013. His work has since appeared on BuzzFeed, in Maxim magazine and on the Reddit front page. He gets his kicks collaborating with friends on fanzines.

 

Read Up and Out here.

 

Rebecca Hendin Editorial Cartoons by Rebecca Hendin

 

Rebecca Hendin

Rebecca Hendin's illustration takes a look at current events with a combination of existential anxiety and sheer amazement at the inexplicable beauty of existence, with a cherry of deadpan jibe on top. Her viewpoint reflects her transatlantic residence between the U.K. and the United States, giving her a unique perspective on situations from both sides of the Atlantic.

 

Rebecca Hendin is a freelance illustrator, painter, doodler, designer and animator, whose illustrations have been seen promoting Edinburgh Fringe at the Underbelly, MTV Presents and many current bands; her work has been featured in publications including the Economist, The Guardian, The Telegraph, Grazia, The Alarmist and Prowl Magazine; she's even had designs on New Era Caps. She has created artwork for Foyles Bookshop, Dance Umbrella, VICE, Passing Clouds, TakeOff Studios, AU Magazine, Island Records, WPP, Estee Lauder, STRIKE! Magazine, Nottingham LeftLion, Whitley Arts Festival, Sow's Ear Publishing, Eurostar, Teenage Cancer Trust and more.

 

Rebecca received her MA in Communication Design from Central Saint Martins (London 2014), and a BA Hons (First Class) from Central Saint Martins (2010). She previously studied at California College of the Arts (San Francisco). Her work has received a bronze medal for advertising from the Los Angeles Society of Illustrators in 2015, and she was shortlisted by the Association of Illustrators for the 2013 and 2014 AOI Awards. Rebecca’s art was awarded and featured in the 2013 and 2014 3x3 Magazine Illustration Annuals. She was a finalist for the Serco Prize for illustration, for which her animation “Our Town” was exhibited in the “London Stories: The Serco Prize for Illustration” exhibition at London Transport Museum in Covent Garden in spring 2014.

 

Rebecca’s iconic and monumental (29 x 8.5 meters) illustration towered over London’s Charing Cross Road as a building wrap covering the old Central Saint Martins building while it was under renovation to become the new Foyles Bookshop.

 

Read Rebecca Hendin editorial cartoons here.

 

La Cucaracha in Spanish by Lalo Alcaraz

La Cucaracha by Lalo Alcaraz

 

Lalo Alcaraz’s La Cucaracha is now available on GoComics in Spanish!

 

La Cucaracha is a unique strip that provides a view of the world through the sharp, satiric lens of its young Latino characters and the fertile mind of acclaimed creator Lalo Alcaraz. Growing up on the U.S./Mexico border gave Lalo a dual outlook on life. He’s not "Mexican" enough for his relatives in Mexico and not "American" enough for some in the U.S.A. It’s this double-edged Spanglish attitude that fuels this jalapeño-biting satirical observations in his daily comic strip, La Cucaracha.

 

Lalo Alcaraz is an award-winning visual and media artist and writer based in Los Angeles who has been chronicling the ascendancy of Latinos in the United States for the last two decades. He is the creator of the syndicated daily comic strip La Cucaracha, which appears in the L.A. Times and other papers nationwide. Lalo is currently a writer at Fox Television's upcoming animated program, "Bordertown," which debuts fall 2015. A prolific political cartoonist, Lalo is winner of five Southern California Press Awards for best editorial cartoon, and he produced editorial cartoons for The LA Weekly from 1992 to 2010. He now creates editorial cartoons in English and Spanish for Universal Uclick and the Huffington Post. He drew the Sonia Sotomayor themed "Lil' Judge Lopez" cartoon, which has appeared on "60 Minutes," CBS News and Univision. Lalo's books include the new "A Most Imperfect Union" U.S. history book with Ilan Stavans, (2014 Perseus Books), "Latino USA: A Cartoon History, 15th Anniversary Edition" (2012 by Basic Books), "Migra Mouse: Political Cartoons On Immigration (2005) and "La Cucaracha" (2004). He is also the "Jefe in Chief" of the satirical website Pocho.com and the co-host of KPFK Radio's satirical talk show, "The Pocho Hour of Power," heard Fridays at 4 p.m. in L.A. on 90.7 FM. Lalo recently taught illustration at Otis College of Fine Art & Design in Los Angeles. He is a graduate of San Diego State University (BA in Art) and UC Berkeley (Master's in Architecture). 

 

Read La Cucaracha in Spanish here or in English here. 

 





April Fool’s Day

April Fool’s Day: A day filled with pranks, humor and mischief. With all the ornery characters featured throughout our 300+ strips, there is no shortage of practical jokes or tomfoolery on GoComics.

 

Whoopee cushions and water balloons are classics, of course, but our comic jokesters constantly take pranking to new heights. So, whether you need ideas for you own April Fool’s prank or you just like to live vicariously through our many pranksters, you know where to find inspiration and laughter on April first. To help you out, we’ve put together an entire collection of April Fool’s Day-related comics.

 

Let’s flash back to some of the most memorable April Fool’s funnies in GoComics history:

 

Sunny Street by Max Garcia
Sunny Street by Max Garcia

 

Grand Avenue by Steve Breen and Mike Thompson
Grand Avenue by Steve Breen and Mike Thompson

 

Nest Heads by John Allen
Nest Heads by John Allen

 

Adam@Home by Rob Harrell
Adam@Home by Rob Harrell

 

Hilarious! Didn’t see your favorite goofball on this list? Check out our full collection of April Fool’s Day comics here.





Staff Pick: Soup to Nutz by Rick Stromoski

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"...And said unto him, Do you hear what these say? And Jesus said unto them, Yea; have you never read, Out of the mouth of babes and infants you have perfected praise?" — Matthew 21:16, (King James 2000 edition)

 

I'm no religious scholar, so I can't tell you exactly what the Bible verse above means. But I do know two things. 1) "From the mouths of babes" is the hilariously effective device used by Soup to Nutz cartoonist Rick Stromoski to poke fun at the world around us, and 2) No GoComics feature does quite as many funny yet tasteful jokes set in churches or using religious imagery.

 

Take, for example, this 2014 comic in which Andrew goes to confession for committing "adultery." Or Royboy's understanding of the rites of communion, in this 2013 strip. Growing up in a Roman Catholic family of 12 clearly had a profound influence on Stromoski's strip, and the result is a delightful interplay of parents and siblings, each with their own personality.

 

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As the cartoonist explained in an interview last year, "Royboy is a boneheaded buffoon, Babs is the intellectual politically correct vegan and Andrew is the kindhearted, sweet Barbie-playing Nancy boy." The Nutz family members can be mean to each other on occasion, but for the most part they get along with each other just fine. 

 

In addition to the aforementioned religious humor (remarkably, the strip never gets reader complaints about this topic — probably because it does so in a lighthearted and tasteful way). Soup to Nutz takes its share of digs at the educational system, and even ventures a political strip now and then.

 

Mostly, however, Soup to Nutz pokes fun at its own characters as they demonstrate their confusion about the solar system or their misunderstanding of the English language well known each and every week. Whatever topics the strips characters are struggling to make sense of, they're discussed in a refreshingly naive and honest way that feels true-to-life and provides the reader with many a chuckle at their own expense.

 

Please join me in congratulating Soup to Nutz on its 15th anniversary as a strip, and if you're new to the misadventures and misunderstandings of the Nutz family, you can start reading it today right here on GoComics.

 

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 —Lucas, Editor

 

Subscribe to Soup to Nutz here!

 

 





Giveaway: Archive-Quality Soup to Nutz Prints – Winners Announced

Soup to Nutz

 

Thank you to all who entered our Soup to Nutz 15th anniversary giveaway!

 

We've randomly selected THREE winners to receive an archive-quality print of the very first Soup to Nutz comic strip PLUS a personalized, autographed copy of "Soup to Nutz: A Second Helping," including a character sketch of the winners' choice!

 

Congratulations to Jack Donnelly, Robert Waldo Brunelle JR. and Kelly McNutt!

 

If your name is listed above, please contact us at rewards@gocomics.com with your shipping address, phone number and personalization/character sketch request. Please note: You must contact us by 4/7/15 or your prize will be forfeited. 





April 2015: Twitter Q&A Schedule

Header-graphic

 

 

Join us Fridays at 1:30pm CT on Twitter for Q&A sessions with our talented GoComics creators!

 

During these one-hour live-tweet sessions, we invite a cartoonist(s) to answer a set of core questions, then field queries from the public. We encourage our fans to take part in these Q&As. To participate, tweet questions or simply follow along, using the designated event hashtag.

 

Now, mark your calendars!

 

THE LINE-UP: 
 
• 4/3 Don Wimmer of Rose is Rose
↳ #AskDonWimmer
  
• 4/10: Ruben Bolling of Tom the Dancing Bug and Super-Fun-Pak Comix
↳ #AskRubenBolling
 
• 4/17: Dave Whamond of Reality Check 
↳ #AskDaveWhamond
 
• 4/24: Kevin Fagan of Drabble 
↳ #AskKevinFagan
 
  




COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.

 

We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

 

3-28-13

 

 

3-28-15

 

 

 

 

The Winy Child  3-28-15

 

 

 

 

 

3-29-15

 

 

 

 

Frank Blunt  3-29-15

 

 

 

 

3-29-15

 

 

 

 

 

3-30-15

 

 

 

Magic Coffee Hair  3-30-15

 

 

 

 

 

Magnificatz  3-30-15

 

 

 

 

Scorched Earth  3-30-15

 

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 
 




This Year’s Best in Culinary Comics

If you’re a super foodie, Food Network-addict like I am, you know that the James Beard Foundation Awards (the Oscars of the culinary world) were announced last week. And, if you didn’t know, now you do!

 

Drawing inspiration from the James Beard Foundation and combining my love of food and comics, I’ve taken some of the award categories and scoured the GoComics universe, looking for this year’s best food funnies!

 

After much searching and careful deliberation, I am pleased to announce the winners for, what I think are, the best culinary cartoons in each of the following categories:

 

In the “Baking and Dessert” category, Paige of Foxtrot definitely takes the cake for her ability to tackle more ice cream than anyone thought to be humanly possible.

 

FoxTrot by Bill Amend

 

This po’ boy from Louisiana takes home the win in the “American Cooking” category for his oh-so-punny ode to Queen. 

 

Reality Check by Dave Whamond

 

Horace the horse’s culinary knowledge earns him the title of top chef in the “Cooking from a Professional Point of View” category.

 

Dark Side of the Horse by Samson

 

A hilariously tragic corncob funeral beats out the competition in the “Vegetable Focused and Vegetarian” category for making us cry tears … of laughter.

 

The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk

 

Half Full by Maria Scrivan stacks up well to its competitors in the “Focus on Health” category for its ability to teach us the secret to success with diet books.

 

Half Full by Maria Scrivan

 

Adam from Adam@Home changed the world forever with his innovative coffee alarm clock, and his genius is rewarded with a first-place win in the “Beverage” category. 

 

Adam@Home by Rob Harrell

 

Finally, honorable mention goes to the moment that shocked us all – otherwise known as last summer’s epic pancake showdown.

 

The Argyle Sweater by Scott Hilburn

 

I’d like to personally thank all of our GoComics cartoonists for making this an extremely hard decision! Super foodie or not, everyone loves a good culinary comic, and we have plenty more where these came from! Click HERE to visit our “Food Funnies” Pinterest board to keep the laughs rolling!

 

– Amanda





Weekend Faves (March 29)

Dogs of C-Kennel by Mick & Mason Mastroianni
Dogs of C-Kennel by Mick & Mason Mastroianni

As someone who minored in Sociology, all I can say is, "No kidding."

--Julie

 

F Minus by Tony Carrillo
F Minus by Tony Carrillo

Surely there's a merit badge for "online resourcefulness."

--Lucas

 

Non Sequitur by Wiley Miller
Non Sequitur by Wiley Miller

I may be talking in this accent fah the rest of the day… it makes everything funniah!
--Amanda

 

Lio by Mark Tatulli
Lio by Mark Tatulli

Hands down, LIO gets my vote for best comic tributes.
--Lindsay

 

Phoebe and Her Unicorn by Dana Simpson
Phoebe and Her Unicorn by Dana Simpson

We are SO thrilled for Dana! Learn more about Phoebe and Her Unicorn's newspaper launch here.

--Julie





Phoebe and Her Unicorn Launches in more than 100 Newspapers

Phoebe_spot

 

Exciting, exiting news! Our parent company, Universal Uclick, launched Phoebe and Her Unicorn in more than 100 newspapers on Mon., March 30!

 

You heard that right! The sparkling, fun-filled adventures are now available in more than 100 newspapers WORLDWIDE!

 

Marking one of the largest comic strip launches in Universal Uclick’s history, we are so happy for creator Dana Simpson!

 

"'If your life suffers from a shortage of unicorns, precocious little girls or sparkles, then I'm excited to be able to help," Simpson said.

 

Many congratulations, Dana!

 

Of course, you can still read Phoebe and her Unicorn each and every day right here on GoComics.

 

See the full news story here.

 

Phoebe and Her Unicorn by Dana Simpson
Phoebe and Her Unicorn by Dana Simpson




New Comic Alert! La Cucaracha by Lalo Alcaraz is Now Available in Spanish

La Cucaracha by Lalo Alcaraz

 

La Cucaracha is now available in Spanish!

 

La Cucaracha is a unique strip that provides a view of the world through the sharp, satiric lens of its young Latino characters and the fertile mind of acclaimed creator Lalo Alcaraz. Growing up on the U.S./Mexico border gave Lalo a dual outlook on life. He’s not "Mexican" enough for his relatives in Mexico and not "American" enough for some in the U.S.A. It’s this double-edged Spanglish attitude that fuels this jalapeño-biting satirical observations in his daily comic strip, La Cucaracha.

 

La Cucaracha es una tira cómica que proporciona una visión del mundo a través del lente agudo y satírico de sus personajes jóvenes y latinos y la mente fértil del aclamado creador Lalo Alcaraz. Crecer en la frontera entre EE.UU.  y Méjico le dio a Lalo una visión dual de la vida. No es lo bastante “mejicano” para sus parientes en Méjico y no es lo bastante “norteamericano” para algunos en EE.UU. Es esta doble actitud “Spanglish” lo que echa leña al fuego de estas observaciones satíricas picantes como un jalapeño en su tira cómica diaria La Cucaracha.  

 

Read La Cucaracha in Spanish here or in English here.  






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