Comic Books for Kids: Broaden Their Minds and Brighten Their Days

Happy National Children’s Day to all of you proud parents out there! On a day that celebrates children and their futures, we couldn’t think of a more perfect opportunity to showcase our favorite ways to brighten, not only your child’s days, but their future, as well!

 

Finding ways to both entertain and educate your kids is not always an easy feat to accomplish. In a previous blog post, we showed you how to “Beat the Summertime Boredom” with some of our kid-friendly interactive comic features: 

 

KidSpot by Dan Thompson
KidSpot by Dan Thompson

 

Now, we’re expanding beyond the digital world of GoComics to tell you about some awesome comic books. Published by our sister company Andrews McMeel Publishing, all are sure to keep your child learning and laughing for days to come, because – let’s be honest – Reading with Pictures is just more fun!

 

Reading With Pictures Comics That Make Kids Smarter by Josh Elder
Reading With Pictures Comics That Make Kids Smarter by Josh Elder

 

The beauty of adventure books like Alien Invasion in My Backyard and The G-Man Super Journal is their ability to make your kids want to keep reading. 

 

Alien Invasion in My Backyard by Ruben Bolling
Alien Invasion in My Backyard by Ruben Bolling

 

A constantly held game-system controller will be replaced with a new favorite book that they can’t put down.

 

The G-Man Super Journal: Awesome Origins by Chris Giarrusso
The G-Man Super Journal: Awesome Origins by Chris Giarrusso

 

With series like The Complete Big Nate, kids won’t have to stop reading! They can follow one of their favorite comic characters through his many book adventures!

 

The Complete Big Nate #1 by Lincoln Peirce
The Complete Big Nate #1 by Lincoln Peirce

 

Speak to your child’s imagination with the magic of Phoebe and Her Unicorn.

 

Phoebe and Her Unicorn by Dana Simpson
Phoebe and Her Unicorn by Dana Simpson

 

Introduce them to the comics that brightened your own childhood. The Peanuts gang is still just as lovable as you remember, and their books are equally as timeless. 

 

Charlie Brown and Friends A Peanuts Collection by Charles M. Schulz
Charlie Brown and Friends: A Peanuts Collection by Charles M. Schulz

 

Celebrate National Children’s Day with a gift that truly keeps on giving, because a book is never just a book – it’s a key, unlocking a world of wonder and adventure.

 

Looking for more entertainingly educational books? Check out our “Comics For Kids” Pinterest board.





Waltzing Through GoComics

One evening, my family gathered in the kitchen, preparing for Thanksgiving dinner (and the visitors that come with it). With my dad on “cleaning duty,” my mom scrambling to perfect her green bean casserole, and my brother and I trying to find the balance between being helpful and staying out of the way, the afternoon had been a bit tense.

 

Then, Peter Gabriel’s “Solsbury Hill” began playing through the speakers. Without warning, my parents began grooving to the beat, laughing as they swayed.

 

Just like that, the tense mood was lifted, and I enjoyed an evening with the people I love the most – all thanks to a spontaneous dance party. It’s one of my favorite memories, and makes me smile whenever I think about it.

 

It’s fun to witness the many styles of dance that flutter across GoComics. Young and old, short and tall, sophisticated and silly, GoComics characters certainly have an appreciation for dancing.

 

Like Rose, who will never pass up the opportunity to pirouette.

 

Rose is Rose by Don Wimmer and Pat Brady
Rose is Rose by Don Wimmer and Pat Brady

 

 

Peanuts is home to the brilliant “Happy Dance.”

 

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

 

There’s certainly no shortage of joyful jives.

 

 

 

Grand Avenue by Steve Breen and Mike Thompson
Grand Avenue by Steve Breen and Mike Thompson

 

 

Baldo by Hector D. Cantu and Carlos Castellanos
Baldo by Hector D. Cantu and Carlos Castellanos

 

 

To some, dancing is just for fun.

 

 

 

Phoebe and Her Unicorn by Dana Simpson
Phoebe and Her Unicorn by Dana Simpson

 

 

Others are training for a serious competition.

 

 

Brevity by Dan Thompson
Brevity by Dan Thompson

 

 

While some characters have two left feet …

 

 

The Born Loser by Art and Chip Sansom
The Born Loser by Art and Chip Sansom

 

 

You can’t deny the beauty and grace in 9 Chickweed Lane.

 

 

9 Chickweed Lane by Brooke McEldowney
9 Chickweed Lane by Brooke McEldowney

 

 

No matter your style, get out there and dance! It’s good for you!

 

 

Frazz by Jef Mallett
Frazz by Jef Mallett

 

 

Baldo by Hector D. Cantu and Carlos Castellanos
Baldo by Hector D. Cantu and Carlos Castellanos

 

– Julie





Meet Your Creator: Cuyler Black (Inherit the Mirth)

ITM logo hi-res 3 copy

 

People often approach me and ask how I come up with ideas for Inherit the Mirth cartoons. I’ve been known to respond with questions of my own: “You need to ask me this at three in the morning? Who are you? How did you get in to my house? And who said you could just pull up a chair next to my bed?”

 

You’d be surprised how often that happens.

 

Anyway, all I know is that I’ve been creating cartoons since I was a little kid growing up in Ottawa, Ontario. When I was 10, my comic strip Ollie the Alligator was published weekly in a local newspaper. Check out this pic of me.

 

 

Genius at work

 

“Genius at work.” If I was such a genius, I would have figured out how to get a better haircut.

 

So, I did that cartoon for a while, and then when I was 17, I launched a brand-new comic strip all about high school life in the big daily Ottawa Citizen. It was called Furtree High and it ran every day for the next six and a half years, sandwiched on the comics page between Cathy and Garfield. In those years, I really honed my skills as a cartoonist. Not coincidentally, because I was also going to school full-time, my commitment to a daily comic strip meant I had absolutely no time to hone dating skills. My girlfriend was an imaginary swimsuit model I named “Cathy Garfield.”

 

 

Furtree High cartoon

 

 

I ended the strip after university so I could backpack around Europe and figure out what I really wanted to do with my life. I decided I wanted to be a superhero. Still working on that.

In the mid-’90s, the cartooning bug bit again (while I was still hoping to be bitten by a radioactive spider instead), and this time I got syndicated with a comic strip about a gym. It was called The Swan Factory and appeared in a dozen papers for a couple of years. Approximately three people remember it.

 

Swan Factory toon

 

 

Eventually, my love of cartooning fused with my Christian faith, and I created a cartoon that many fans have called “The Far Side meets the Bible.” And by “many fans,” I mean me.

 

 

Inherit the Mirth by Cuyler Black

 

 

The vision statement, if you will, for Inherit the Mirth is inspired by Genesis 21:6: “God has brought me laughter.” And I really believe it’s true — that God brings laughter. There’s a common misconception of God being an always angry, vengeful, humorless deity, but the truth is that God is supremely a God of joy. That’s the God that Jesus portrays. And if you look for it from first page to last in the Bible, you’ll find all kinds of evidence for the Almighty’s sense of humor. And if a Christian isn’t channeling that humor, at least from time to time, then he or she just isn’t living the way they were made to.

 

OK, so anyway, I’m having a great time with Inherit the Mirth, and I hope you are too.

 

 

Headshot

 

 

And in case you’re wondering, I eventually honed enough dating skills to convince a beautiful woman named Lisa to marry me. Along with our son, Xander, we live in New Jersey, where I am currently also a pastor at Liquid Church. You can Google it. It’s not a cult, but with that name, I know that’s what you’re thinking.

 

Now, if you’ll excuse me, it’s 2 a.m. and I have to deal with a guy who just came through an open window at my house to ask me where I get my ideas for Inherit the Mirth.

 

I think it’s time for a home security system.

 

Read Inherit the Mirth here or follow along on Facebook.





Laugh Tracks Look Back (July 18 – 24)

We know life can get busy! At the end of each week, we compile the most pressing GoComics blog posts from the week to ensure you didn’t miss a thing!

 

LaughTracks_LookBack_Header

 

 

Dave Coverly provided a glimpse into his cartooning career.

 

“In high school, my journalism teacher took my cartooning aspirations seriously, and began bringing in The New Yorker magazine so I could read the cartoons. And by 'read,' I mean 'study.' I didn’t understand many of the gags, but I loved that they made me think so hard. It was rewarding every time I 'got' one. Those were the years when I realized what exactly I wanted to do.”

 

 

We celebrated Overboard’s 25th anniversary this week with three very special blog posts!

 

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Creator Chip Dunham showcased his top 25 favorite comics.

Overboard editor Sue Roush shared history and humor behind the comic. 

 

 

G-Man Webcomics joined the GoComics lineup.

 

G-Man Webcomics by Chris Giarrusso

 

 

 

In honor of Space Exploration Day, we took a trip to outer space with Red and Rover.

 

 

Red and Rover by Brian Basset

 

 

 

GoComics Spotlight: Reply All by Donna A. Lewis

 

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Pearls Before Swine creator Stephan Pastis may be coming to your city!

 

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July is National Ice Cream month! GoComics goes crazy for cones. 

 

“They are the people who attempt to sample as many flavors as socially acceptable at Baskin Robbins, making it through all 31 on a slow day; who know the ice cream truck’s jingle by heart and live for the thrill of chasing it down; who get giddy at the thought of sprinkles and, no matter how full they are, know that there is always room left for ice cream.”

 

 

Are whales smarter than humans? We investigate. 

 

 

We’re giving away two HUGE collections of San Diego Comic-Con swag!

 

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We hosted a Q&A session with John "Scully" Scully, creator of The Comic Strip That Has a Finale Every Day.

 

 

Flashback Friday: Time Traveling through Comics History

 

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 “Join us aboard the GoComics time machine as we travel as far back as 1895, retracing the steps of comic history and highlighting a few of our vintage features that helped shape the world of cartooning as we know it.”

 

 

Reunited and it Feels so Good (Or at least OK). Read family reunion funnies filled with bear hugs, cheek pinching and adult beverages.

 

 

Scenes from San Diego Comic-Con: Brooke McEldowney's Sketch Diary

 

 

Pibgorn by Brooke McEldowney

 

 

Cheers to another great week on the GoComics blog!





Ginger Meggs: Australia’s Favourite Boy

Ginger Meggs cartoonist Jason Chatfield shares details about a one-of-a-kind exhibition!

 

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Today marks the opening of the biggest comic strip exhibition in Australian history. “Ginger Meggs: Australia’s Favourite Boy” is a 94-year retrospective, curated by Anna Cossu and the team at the Museum of Sydney to celebrate Australia’s longest-running and beloved comic strip.

 

Since his first appearance in the Us Fellers comic strip in Sydney’s Sunday Sun newspaper in 1921, Ginger Meggs and his loyal gang, girlfriend Minnie Peters and enemy Tiger Kelly have kept us company for more than 90 years.

 

A new exhibition at Museum of Sydney, “Ginger Meggs: Australia’s Favourite Boy,” explores the story of this much-loved comic character, from his creation in 1921 by Sydney artist James “Jimmy” Bancks to his latest incarnation by current artist Jason Chatfield, and along the way, how the lovable larrikin became an Australian icon.

 

 

Evolution-of-Meggs

 

 

In 1935, Eric Baume, then editor of the Sunday Sun, claimed Ginger Meggs was "the most human character created by any cartoonist in the second and third decades of the century. Not because Ginger is loved by the 280,000 readers of the Sunday Sun is this assertion made, but because the sheer Australian characteristics of the lad have endeared him to readers of newspapers in every part of this country and of New Zealand."

 

The then Prime Minister of Australia, John Curtin, understood what was happening and said, "Ginger Meggs is Australia's Peter Pan. Most of us can recognize in him our own youth, but unlike him, we had to grow up."

GM1425-90th-PrintThe exhibition features original strips by Ginger’s fathers, Bancks, and his successors Ron Vivian, Lloyd Piper, James Kemsley and Jason Chatfield, along with a wonderful collection of Ginger Meggs memorabilia.

 

“Born in Sydney to local artist Jimmy Bancks, Ginger Meggs has been enormously popular with generations of Australians and is still published in over 120 newspapers across Australia and around the world,” said Sydney Living Museums curator Anna Cossu.

 

“With his vivid red hair, larrikin boy charms and never-ending ability to get himself into and out of trouble, Ginger Meggs is a mischievous character whose everyday escapades echo the experiences of millions of Australian children.”

 

While “Ginge,” as he is affectionately known, and his loyal gang never grow a day older, the world around them has changed dramatically, and the exhibition explores how the comic strip has adapted to new eras under the pen of each artist.

 

Billycart-derby-series-fullsize

 

Throughout his lifetime, readers have seen Ginger Meggs evolve from the 1930s world of billycarts, wireless radios and cricket games played in the street to the computer-drawn strips of today, in which Ginger laments the loss of Internet connection. During World War II, Ginger was drawn on sides of Australian airplanes and appeared in Army News; he was used in road safety campaigns in the 1950s and, controversially, entered the Space Age in the 1960s.

 

The world of Ginger Meggs continued off the page, too, with an array of commercial products and merchandise, from his own spinoff Little Golden Book stories to dolls and clothing, songs and tableware. In the 1970s, Ginger emerged in the works of celebrated Australian pop artist Martin Sharp, and a feature film released in 1982, along with a change in fathers, from Piper to Kemsley, saw a resurgence in the resilient character’s popularity.

 

Ginger has crossed over into the online space now with his own iMeggsie.com, designed specifically for mobile devices, along with an active community on Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr, and of course, every day on GoComics.

 

 

IMeggsie main

 

 

The exhibition will take visitors behind the scenes, exploring how Bancks and his successors created their comic strips, and also enable visitors to try their hand at drawing Ginger Meggs. Plus, a display of original and reproduction Ginger Meggs comic strips by all of the artists will appeal to visitors of all ages. The Exhibition runs from July 25 to Nov. 8.

 

Learn more about the exhibition here. Or, read Ginger Meggs here.

 

– Jason Chatfield, Ginger Meggs cartoonist





Twitter Q&A with John "Scully" Scully of The Comic Strip That Has A Finale Every Day

Finale_Scully_3

 

All the thanks in the world to John "Scully" Scully for taking time out of his busy schedule for a Twitter Q&A! We had a ton of fun. Catch up on the chat here, or use the widget below: 

 

 

Subscribe to The Comic Strip That Has A Finale Every Day here 

 

NEXT UP (Friday, July 31): Join us next Friday for a chance to chat live with Wrong Hands creator John Atkinson! Follow along and tweet in using: #AskJohnAtkinson. 





Scenes from San Diego Comic-Con: Brooke McEldowney's Sketch Diary

With 130,000 enthusiastic comics and pop-culture fans in attendance at San Diego Comic-Con earlier this month, there was no shortage of superhero sightings and astonishing cosplay on the show floor.

 

Embarking on a journey from Maine to San Diego to attend SDCC, Brooke McEldowney shared several scenes from his experience at the ’con though his comic Pibgorn.

 

Pibgorn by Brooke McEldowney

 

 

Pibgorn by Brooke McEldowney

 

 

Pibgorn by Brooke McEldowney

 

 

Pibgorn by Brooke McEldowney

 

Flip through McEldowney’s “Comic-Con Sketch Diary” from the beginning here.





Flashback Friday: Time Traveling through Comics History

With today (July 24) being Tell an Old Joke Day, we’re bringing you a Flashback Friday of epic proportions! Join us aboard the GoComics time machine as we travel as far back as 1895, retracing the steps of comic history and highlighting a few of our vintage features that helped shape the world of cartooning as we know it.

 

Our journey begins where funnies first started: Origins of the Sunday ComicsSpanning 1895 to 1915, Origins of the Sunday Comics offers a look at some of the very first comics ever created. Whether you’re a history buff, a comic fanatic, or both, it’s impossible not to be wowed by how far the Sunday funnies have come.

 

Origins of the Sunday Comics by Peter Maresca
Origins of the Sunday Comics by Peter Maresca

 

The definition of “timeless,” Winsor McCay’s Little Nemo first appeared in 1905, and still delights readers to this day. A beautiful strip, McCay’s endless imagination splashes onto each page in glorious color, taking you on whimsical adventures to places you’ve only dreamed of.

 

Little Nemo by Winsor McCay
Little Nemo by Winsor McCay

 

As we continue our transition into the 20th century, we stop in 1921: the year that “Australia’s Favourite Boy” first came onto the scene. Since debuting in Sydney’s Sunday Sun newspaper, Ginger Meggs has transcended generations as one of the longest-running cartoons in comic history. Ninety years later, under the pens of multiple cartoonists, Ginger Meggs may have a new look, but his boyish charm is still very much present, and as delightful as ever.

 

Meet Your Creator: Jason Chatfield
Meet Your Creator: Jason Chatfield



With another year comes the debut of another classic comic strip, Fritzi Ritz. In 1933, Ernie Bushmiller, who took over the strip three years after its debut, introduced a new character: a precocious 8-year old girl. By 1938, Fritzi Ritz was renamed Nancy, after its new little star, and the rest, as they say, is history.

 

Nancy Classics transports us back to 1955: a time of poodle skirts and bobby socks, during the peak of Nancy’s fame. Between the simplicity of the time period and Nancy’s enduring, childlike innocence, it’s hard not to smile when reading this strip.

 

Nancy Classics by Ernie Bushmiller
Nancy Classics by Ernie Bushmiller

 

The journey continues!  Let’s travel to 1923, when, to the joy of readers and critics alike, Percy Crosby’s legendary Skippy first appeared in newspapers. Serving as inspiration behind many popular comics – such as Peanuts and Calvin and Hobbes –to name a few, Skippy is undoubtedly one of the most beloved characters of all time. 

 

Skippy by Percy Crosby
Skippy by Percy Crosby

 

Our final destination is 1950, as Peanuts Begins takes us through the classic adventures of the Peanuts gang, from their very first appearance in newspapers. Charlie Brown and all your favorites are here to accompany you on your trip down memory lane, and, together, you can retrace the steps leading to what is now regarded as one of history’s most iconic comic strips.

 

Peanuts Begins by Charles Schulz
Peanuts Begins by Charles Schulz

 

We hope you’ve enjoyed this cruise through comic history as much as we have! Our trip may be over, but you can celebrate Tell an Old Joke Day any day, with all of our timeless classics on GoComics! 





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.

 

We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

Girth  7-21-15

 

 

 

 

Limbo Road  7-22-15

 

 

 

 

Bushy Tales  7-22-15

 

BUSHY TALES

 

 


A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here. 

 





Whale Fails

There are many scientific studies out there aiming to prove that whales are smarter than humans. After conducting a little research of my own (comic research, that is), I’ve come to the conclusion that, in the world of comics, at least, the two species are neck-and-neck in terms of intelligence.

 

Whale fails are a common sight on GoComics, and there have been many theories behind their causes. For example, like people, whales are sometimes guilty of “not needing” directions.

 

WuMo by Wulff & Morgenthaler
WuMo by Wulff & Morgenthaler

 

They also fall victim to the latest and not-always-greatest beauty trends. 

 

The Argyle Sweater by Scott Hilburn
The Argyle Sweater by Scott Hilburn

 

A real plot twist is the theory that whales are actually beaching themselves on purpose.

 

Brevity by Dan Thompson
Brevity by Dan Thompson

 

As I’ve mentioned, whales aren’t the only GoComics mammals guilty of goofing up. The humans have some pretty epic failures themselves. 

 

Close to Home by John McPherson
Close to Home by John McPherson

 

Drabble by Kevin Fagan
Drabble by Kevin Fagan

 

The Duplex by Glenn McCoy
The Duplex by Glenn McCoy

 

As one Charlie Brown would say ... "good grief."

 

– Amanda





GoComics A to Z, Vol 6: Reply All

In this weekly series, editor Lucas Wetzel spotlights new and unusual comic features from the GoComics A-Z listing.

 

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Feature: Reply All
Creator: Donna A. Lewis
Format: four panels
Frequency: daily
Recommended if you like: Cathy, Dilbert, humor related to office politics, self-appearance and family members who don't know how to use email properly

 

Each week we get submissions detailing people's childhood dreams of creating a syndicated comic strip. Many of them write that it's the only job they could ever imagine having. But it's often those who have labored in other professions who wind up finding the most joy and consistency in the cartooning profession. In other words, when you work hard for something and know what the alternative looks like, it's hard to take that success for granted. At least that's the vibe I get from Donna A. Lewis, whose daily comic "Reply All" chronicles the day-to-day neuroses and social interactions of Lizzie, a highly self-aware single woman in the public relations industry. Like Stephan Pastis, Lewis has a background in law, and she still works as an attorney for the Department of Homeland Security even while producing "Reply All," which has been syndicated by the Washington Post Writers Group since 2011. Lewis' art isn't terribly sophisticated, but when it comes to the writing, the characters' clever exchanges, modern concerns and streamlined dialogue give "Reply All" a subversive, socially conscious flair. For example, take the two-day sequence on mansplaining below.

 

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The issue is handled in a way that a white male reader like me (presumably the most offending category of "mansplainers") feels in on the joke. The feminine perspective will appeal to readers of Cathy (a character Lewis has said she does not personally identify with), and the office humor is similar at times to Dilbert, but "Reply All" feels more of-the-moment than those two classics, like a comic your witty colleague doodled during a meeting and made everyone in the office giggle. Which, in fact, is exactly how "Reply All" came into being. Here's a couple more recent strips: 

 

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Read more "Reply All" every day right here on GoComics.com!





25 Years of Overboard in 25 Strips

Overboard turns 25 today (July 22)!

 

To commemorate and reflect over this milestone anniversary, Overboard creator Chip Dunham has shared his favorite 25 Overboard comic strips and included insight behind his top 5 favorites!

 

1. September 16, 1990

 

Overboard by Chip Dunham

 

 

“I wanted to show some of my early stuff. This was a Sunday from Sept. 16, 1990. I remember Lee Salem, who bought Overboard and gave me my chance to be a cartoonist, looked at my art and said, "You'll get better."  I used a lot of silent panels before the punchline in those days. Loved that comedic pause, you know?”

 

 

2. April 26, 1997

 

Overboard by Chip Dunham

 

“This is the first appearance of Louie in the strip. I guess I didn't think of him as a lab in those early appearances, or maybe this was my best attempt at drawing a dog. I remember worrying about whether I could keep thinking of ideas for him. Then he just kind of took OVER the whole thing.”

 

 

3. January 10, 1997  

 

Overboard by Chip Dunham

 

 

“None of the guys have had much luck with women, and looking through these old ones for my 25th, I wish I'd been able to dream up a solid recurring female character. It wasn't for lack of trying, believe me, and I'm still working on it. Meanwhile, I still like to make the guys fail entertainingly.”

 

 

4. July 13, 2015

 

Overboard by Chip Dunham

 

“The mice just showed up one day out of nowhere in my sketchpad, and they just kept coming back. I think of them as having this wonderful little universe behind the ship's walls, and I like how everyone – dogs, pirates, mice – just kind of gets along. And, I like how the mice won't take any BS from anybody.”

 

 

5. June 30, 2008

  Overboard by Chip Dunham

 

“I had to show my little tribute to my dog, Basil. He was my constant buddy for years, a beautiful black lab, a very noble goof, and I got tons of ideas just watching him trying to make sense of his world. My neighbor once told me, "Even in the worst storm, I'll look out, and sure enough, there you two idiots'll be, walking by!"

 

View the rest of Chip’s favorite Overboard comic strips here. Or, read Overboard here.

 

Congratulations on a successful 25 years, Chip!





Giveaway: Archive-Quality Overboard Comic Strips

Overboard by Chip Dunham
Overboard by Chip Dunham

 

In honor of Overboard’s 25th anniversary, creator Chip Dunham shared his top 25 favorite comic strips with us. You have a chance to win an archive-quality print of one of these comics!

 

To enter, browse the collection of Chip’s favorite comics here. Then, leave a comment on this blog post, linking to your favorite Overboard comic from the collection, and include your first and last names. This contest will end Tues., July 28 at 10 a.m. CT. Five winners will be randomly selected and announced that day on this blog.





Celebrating 25 Years of Overboard

As a tribute to Overboard on its 25th anniversary (July 22), editor Sue Roush shares her love for the comic strip – and especially Louie!

 

Reading Overboard is one of the best things about my job. I even feel guilty sometimes, getting paid to do something I love so much. You see, I'm a dog person. And maybe that's why Overboard has been a 25-year obsession for me. Chip's a dog person, too, and anyone who reads the strip can see that, because from the start, Louie has enjoyed special status as a crew member on the Revenge.

 

Some would say Louie is the true captain of the ship.

 

Overboard by Chip Dunham

 

 

Louie knows how to get what he wants.

 

Overboard by Chip Dunham

 

 

But he's also good at following directions.

 

Overboard by Chip Dunham

 

 

And even though he makes mistakes sometimes ...

 

Overboard by Chip Dunham

 

 

... he always tries his best to be helpful.

 

Overboard by Chip Dunham

 

 

Living on a pirate ship can be dangerous, and in dire situations, the crew knows Louie has their back.

 

Overboard by Chip Dunham

 

 

That's why any one of them will happily go to extreme lengths to make Louie happy.

 

 

Overboard by Chip Dunham

 

 

It's a story I've been following with joy for 25 years, and I'm so glad that Louie's still chasing the dream.

 

Overboard by Chip Dunham
 

Congratulations, Chip, on 25 years of Overboard! I'm all settled in for 25 more.

– Sue

 

Read Overboard here. Or, view the collection of creator Chip Dunham’s favorite comic strips here.





Stephan Pastis Tours ‘This Whole Angry Nation’ for the ‘One Step Ahead of the Mob’ Tour

The 'One Step Ahead of the Mob' Tour
The 'One Step Ahead of the Mob' Tour

 

In a recent blog post, Stephan Pastis announced that, in honor of his upcoming Pearls Before Swine Treasury, Pearls Gets Sacrificed, he will be “touring this whole angry nation” on the 'One Step Ahead of the Mob’ Tour. As he clarifies, the purpose of this tour isn’t to be burned at the stake, but to talk about himself, Pearls Before Swine, “and – if someone out there brings [him] gin – to sign your book.”

 

Pearls Gets Sacrificed by Stephan Pastis
Pearls Gets Sacrificed by Stephan Pastis

 

So far, the dates for the this event are as follows:

 

  • Sep 5 @ Washington Convention Center (Washington D.C.)
  • Sep 20 @ San Jose Public Library (San Jose, CA)
  • Sep 21 @ Tacoma News Tribune (Tacoma, WA)
  • Sep 22 @ Missoulian Newspaper (Missoula, MT)
  • Sep 24 @ The Denver Post (Denver, CO)
  • Sep 25 @ Barnes & Noble at LSU (Baton Rouge, LA)
  • Sep 27 @ Paladium Theatre (Saint Petersburg, FL)
  • Sep 28 @ Knoxville News Sentinel (Knoxville, TN)
  • Sep 29 @ St. Louis Public Library (St. Louis, MO)

 

To find out more about each of these dates and the ‘One Step Ahead of the Mob’ Tour, visit the event’s page.

 

Pre-order Pearls Gets Sacrificed, here.





Create Your Own Comics on ComicBookPaper.Com!

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Comicbookpaper.com

 

Reading comics is a blast, but have you ever wondered what it would be like to try your hand at creating them? Now, with Comic Book Paper’s 100+ free, downloadable templates, you can indulge your curiosity and let your creativity shine, and discover what it’s like to be on the other side of the funny pages!

 

After deciding on a panel count and layout, you can download your template for free, and choose between printing it out or opening it in your favorite digital editing software. From there, you just let the magic happen! Download. Print. Create. It’s as simple as that!

 

Click here to get started, and feel free to share your creations with us on Facebook or Twitter. We’d love to see what you come up with!

 

Looking for more inspiration? Hear what inspires GoComics cartoonists in our “Meet Your Creator” series.





Crazy for Cones

They are the people who attempt to sample as many flavors as socially acceptable at Baskin Robbins, making it through all 31 on a slow day; who know the ice cream truck’s jingle by heart and live for the thrill of chasing it down; who get giddy at the thought of sprinkles and, no matter how full they are, know that there is always room left for ice cream.

 

Ice cream fanatics; they’re everywhere on GoComics, and – with July being National Ice Cream Month – we thought we’d give a shout-out in admiration to some of our favorites. We all scream for ice cream, but no one goes as crazy for a cone as them. 

 

A clever breed, these ice cream connoisseurs constantly make us laugh with their undying devotion to tasty frozen treats.

 

Lola by Todd Clark
Lola by Todd Clark

 

While some people can be thwarted by obstacles such as hot pavement …

 

Grand Avenue by Steve Breen and Mike Thompson
Grand Avenue by Steve Breen and Mike Thompson

 

Our comic ice cream buffs let no evil stand in their way.

 

Savage Chickens by Doug Savage
Savage Chickens by Doug Savage

 

They laugh in the face of brain freeze, knowing that when it comes to a sundae, there’s no time to waste.

 

Drabble by Kevin Fagan
Drabble by Kevin Fagan

 

Although there is something for everyone on the neighborhood ice cream truck …

 

Strange Brew by John Deering
Strange Brew by John Deering

 

Why would anyone settle for just one something? The word “moderation” is not in the ice cream-lover’s vocabulary. 

 

Frazz by Jef Mallett
Frazz by Jef Mallett

 

But don’t think that a quadruple-decker cone means they’re going to share …

 

Nancy by Guy Gilchrist
Nancy by Guy Gilchrist




COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.

 

We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

 And now...  7-17-15

 

 

 

Picpak Dog  7-17-15

 

 

 

 

Caffeinated  7-20-15

 

 

 

 

D.B. Cartoons  7-20-15

 

 

 

 

7-20-15

 

 

 

 

Teddy Bears' Killing Spree  7-20-15

 

 

 

 

Thingesque  7-20-15

 

 

 

 
A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here. 

 





Giveaway – Special Edition Signed San Diego Comic-Con Swag

We had a BLAST at San Diego Comic-Con, meeting our fans, taking in the amazing cosplay and being surrounded by comics enthusiasts!

 

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Luann creator Greg Evans with daughter Karen
IMG_4805
Pearls Before Swine creator Stephan Pastis

 

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The GoComics/Andrews McMeel Publishing Booth at SDCC


We couldn’t return from the 'con without bringing back some souvenirs to share!

 

 

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Souvenirs from SDCC 2015! (Click to enlarge.)

 

 

We’re giving away two MASSIVE collections of SDCC goodies! Each prize pack includes an SDCC loot bag, an SDCC 2015 Events Guide or Souvenir Book AND a print or poster signed by each of the following:

 

• Lalo Alcaraz (La Cucaracha, editorial cartoonist)
• Paige Braddock (The Martian Confederacy, Jane’s World)
• Jason Chatfield (Ginger Meggs)
• Greg Evans (Luann)
• Steve McGarry (Badlands, Biographic, KidTown, TrivQuiz)
• Stephan Pastis (Pearls Before Swine)
• Nick Seluk (The Awkward Yeti)
• Paul Trap (Thatababy)

 

That’s not all! We’re adding in swag from previous SDCC experiences, including prints signed by:

 

SDCCPrizePack
Prizes from past San Diego Comic-Cons! (Click to enlarge.)

 

 

• Lalo Alcaraz (La Cucaracha, editorial cartoonist)

• Bill Amend (FoxTrot)

• Jim Benton (Jim Benton Cartoons)

• Paige Braddock (The Martian Confederacy, Jane’s World)

• Berkeley Breathed (The Academia Waltz, Bloom County)

• Todd Clark (Lola)

• Brian Crane (Pickles)

• Greg Evans (Luann)

• Shaenon K. Garrity (Skin Horse)

• Rob Harrell (Adam@Home)

• Keith Knight (The K Chronicles, The Knight Life, (th)ink)

• Lela Lee (Angry Little Girls)

• John Lustig (Last Kiss)

• Brooke McEldowney (9 Chickweed Lane, Pibgorn)

• Steve McGarry (Badlands, Biographic, KidTown, TrivQuiz)

• Scott Meyer (Basic Instructions)

• Doug Savage (Savage Chickens)

• Bob Scott (Molly and the Bear)

• Josh Shalek (Kid Shay Comics)

• Justin Thompson (MythTickle)

• Lucas Turnbloom (Imagine This)

• Shannon Wheeler (Too Much Coffee Man)

 

To enter, comment on this blog post with a link to your favorite comic that is included in the prize pack. Please also include your first and last name. This contest will end on Mon., July 27 at 10 a.m. CT. The winners will be announced that day on this blog.

 

 





Weekend Faves (July 19)

Ordinary Bill by William Wilson
Ordinary Bill by William Wilson

The optimist in me wants to believe that Bill got away.

--Julie

 

The Buckets by Greg Cravens
The Buckets by Greg Cravens

My every-morning struggle at Starbucks: "I'll just have a small – I mean, 'tall' – cup of … coffee?"
--Amanda

 

The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk
The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk

You're not alone, Yeti. I've yet to learn this lesson myself.

-- Lindsay

 

Phoebe and Her Unicorn by Dana Simpson
Phoebe and Her Unicorn by Dana Simpson

C'mon, Marigold. Can't you work some unicorn magic and help Phoebe conquer her fears?

--Julie

 

Prickly City by Scott Stantis
Prickly City by Scott Stantis

With all the partisan rancor in Prickly City, it's nice to see Carmen and Winslow agree on the awesomeness of Pluto (even if they don't agree on whether or not its a planet).
--Lucas

 

Speaking of Pluto, did you know today (July 20) is Space Exploration Day? Venture to outer space with Red and Rover here.






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