Happy National Sibling Day!

Whether you have one sibling or a dozen, you know the bond between brothers and sisters is unlike any other. You fight with them, compete with them and tattle on them, but they’re your partners in crime, and you know they’ll always be there for you.

 

Today is National Sibling Day, and to celebrate, we’ve rounded up five things everyone with a sibling knows to be true:

 

1. Your siblings keep you humble.

 

Adam@Home by Rob Harrell
Adam@Home by Rob Harrell

 


2. They’re always looking for something to use against you.

 

Oh, Brother! by Bob Weber Jr. and Jay Stephens
Oh, Brother! by Bob Weber Jr. and Jay Stephens

 

3. They do everything in their power to keep you on your toes.

 

Cul de Sac by Richard Thompson
Cul de Sac by Richard Thompson

 

 

4. They secretly love whatever perks they get for being older or younger than you.

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

5. Even though they’ll never admit it to anyone, they’re pretty proud to be your sibling.

 

Stone Soup by Jan Eliot
Stone Soup by Jan Eliot

 

 

For more sibling shenanigans, check out our comic collection!





Meet Your Creator: Don Asmussen (Bad Reporter)

MYC_blog_header

 

The GoComics “Meet Your Creator” series brings you firsthand insight into the lives and careers of your favorite cartoonists. Each week, we hand over the keys to one of our talented creators, who share their inspirations, achievements, creative processes, studios and more! Read on to hear from this week’s featured cartoonist: Don Asmussen of Bad Reporter.

 

 

BAD REPORTER by Don Asmussen

 

When did you start cartooning?

 

When I was about 5, I had a dream that eventually an extremely wealthy and hubristic real estate tycoon would run for president and destroy the world. I awoke and immediately asked my father to buy me some crayons. By that evening, I had completed my very first editorial cartoon diatribe against Donald Trump (this was around 1973-ish). I couldn't get it published anywhere, being it almost 35 years too early. So, I hung on to this precious cargo. Years and years later, it finally is relevant. But now, I can't find it.

 

So, I try to recreate it every day. The original was funnier. I wish I could find it.

 

 

How did you begin your career as a cartoonist?

 

I was hired at the Lowell (Massachusetts) Sun to create illustrations and charts, plus editorial cartoons. I purposely sucked at charts. Then, I even started sucking at illustrations. All that was left to do was visual political commentary about Donald Trump. Again, they wouldn't publish them since they were around 30 years too early. Now, though, the Lowell Sun sees what I was talking about. They should've realized I was playing the long game.

 

 

Where did you find inspiration?

 

Donald Trump. Did you miss that part of my last two answers?

 

It was Trump.

 

 

BAD REPORTER by Don Asmussen

 

 

What comics did you read as a child?

 

I didn't really like comics. As a kid I read Spider-Man comic books. Newspaper comics weren't my thing – too many cats and neurotic women. I loved Benny Hill when I was very stupid and young, and then moved up to Monty Python as I grew older and didn't just want to watch Benny Hill’s dancers. So British comedy shows were my thing. I like Jack Davis' Mad magazine covers, but I never read the actual mags. I loved Mark Alan Stamaty's "Washingtoon" in the Village Voice when I was in college. That was my first comic love, and I'm still angry at Newsweek for screwing his career up. Stamaty is the king, and that he never got a Pulitzer is a travesty. "Washingtoon" changed everything for me. Congressman Bob Forehead looks sorta like Joe Scarborough.

 

 

BAD REPORTER by Don Asmussen

 

What comics do you read today?

 

I don't really see comics very often. I love Ruben Bolling (Tom the Dancing Bug, Super-Fun-Pak Comix). Roz Chast is amazing. I don't know the dailies.

 

 

What do you call your political comic "Bad Reporter"?

 

 

BAD REPORTER by Don Asmussen

 

It's based on Stephen Glass and Jayson Blair, bad reporters who made up stuff. Spinning the spin, incorrect Wikipedia-esque reporting. I used to love the old newspaper parodies like "Not the New York Times" back in the ’70s, which I'm sure The Onion was birthed from. I love news speak, the way newspapers instantly seem like they are keeping something from you. Headline wording is an art form of leaving out most of the facts or perspective. I love lack of perspective. It makes everybody funny. Donald Trump is the ultimate example of arrogant ignorance, very Python and very Congressman Bob Forehead. I hope Stamaty gets a lifetime achievement award. "Washingtoon" saw it all back in 1978. Plus, my drawing of Trump when I was 5. I was right on it. I've gotta look for that.

 

 

What are your other projects?

 

 

BAD REPORTER by Don Asmussen

 

I'm working on fake documentaries, using animation and audio. Did a bunch back in the ’90s with a company called Mondo Media. I hope to figure out a way to make them cost-effective. I should ask Mark Fiore how he does it. I'd like to do more of that – I enjoyed working on them before, the scripting, drawing and flash animating and the sound recording. It was super fun. But I'm not sure if media companies want to pay for it. I guess I'll find out.

 

Read Bad Reporter here.

  





Everybody’s Working for the Weekend

 
The Flying McCoys by Glenn and Gary McCoy
The Flying McCoys by Glenn and Gary McCoy

 

It’s been a long week, but the end is in sight.

 

Dilbert by Scott Adams
Dilbert by Scott Adams

 

You’ve endured four days of subarctic office temperatures, soul-sucking fluorescent lighting and meeting after meeting. 

 

Andertoons by Mark Anderson
Andertoons by Mark Anderson

 

You’ve followed up, circled back and double-checked more projects than you thought possible.

 

Joe Vanilla by Mark Litzler
Joe Vanilla by Mark Litzler

 

Even the CEO has had enough!

 

 

9 to 5 by Harley Schwadron
9 to 5 by Harley Schwadron

 

Just focus on getting through today.

 

Moderately Confused by Jeff Stahler
Moderately Confused by Jeff Stahler

 

You can do it!





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

 

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.


We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

Inkwell Forest  4-5-16

 

 

 

 

Lilley's Sillies  4-5-16

 

 

 

 

The Gray Zone  4-5-16

 

 

 

 

Amanda the Great  4-6-16

 

 

 

 

 

Charmy's Army  4-6-16

 

 

 

 

Don't Pick the Flowers  4-6-16

 

 

 

 

4-6-16

 

 

 

Minihahas  4-6-16

 

 

 

My Son Is A Dog  4-6-16

 

 

 

 

Aaron Guile  4-7-16

 

 

 

 A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 

 





World Health Day 2016: Stay Super, Beat Diabetes

Every year on World Health Day, the World Health Organization campaigns to increase awareness of a critical global health issue. This year, the focus is on diabetes.

 

Health Capsules by Bron Smith
Health Capsules by Bron Smith

 

What does all this have to do with comics? Glad you asked! As we learned last week, comics can be amazing educational resources. For example, Health Capsules is a single-panel comic featuring a short, health-related Q&A.

 

In honor of World Health Day, we’re teaming up with Health Capsules to bring you a dose of diabetes facts. According to WHO, diabetes caused more than 1.5 million deaths in 2012, and cases continue to increase around the world. In many cases, diabetes can be prevented through lifestyle changes.


Here are some more facts from Health Capsules:

 

Health Capsules by Bron Smith
Health Capsules by Bron Smith

 

 

Health Capsules by Bron Smith
Health Capsules by Bron Smith

 

Health Capsules by Bron Smith
Health Capsules by Bron Smith

  

The World Health Organization agrees that a healthy diet low in added sugar is key to preventing diabetes. Want to reduce your sugar intake? Check out Cut the Sugar, You’re Sweet Enough by Ella Leché, a recently released cookbook from our publishing division.

 

Cut the Sugar, You're Sweet Enough by Ella Leché
Cut the Sugar, You're Sweet Enough by Ella Leché

 

 

Cut the Sugar features low-sugar, no-sugar and naturally sweetened recipes — like Three-Ingredient Chocolate Pudding and Homemade Peanut Butter Cups  — from Leché’s popular food blog, Pure Ella. Don’t worry — you won’t miss the sweet stuff!

 

Buy your copy here!

 

For more information on World Health Day and diabetes, visit the World Health Organization’s website.


Click here for more health-related Q&As from Health Capsules.





GIVEAWAY: Frazz 15th Anniversary Print

On April 2, Jef Mallet’s Frazz turned 15 years old!

 

We’re giving away a collectible print of Saturday’s anniversary strip to celebrate this wonderful milestone.

 

To enter:

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

This contest will end on April 12, 2016, at 12 a.m. CT. We will randomly select one winner and notify the winner via email on April 12, 2016.

 

In the meantime, click here to read Frazz on GoComics, and click here to read Frazz editor Kendra Phipps' reflections on the past 15 years.

 

The next giveaway will be announced on April 13, 2016 at 6 a.m. CT.





Cheers for Beers!

The Duplex by Glenn McCoy
The Duplex by Glenn McCoy

 

On April 7, 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Cullen-Harrison Act into law, legalizing the sale of beer for the first time since Prohibition began in 1920.

 

Naturally, thirsty Americans responded to the good news with a nationwide kegger, and we’ve been celebrating ever since.

 

Andy Capp by Reg Smythe
Andy Capp by Reg Smythe

 

For those of you keeping score at home, that means April 6 is New Beer’s Eve!

 

How should you celebrate this glorious holiday duo? We have some suggestions, courtesy of our publishing division!

 

Cheese and Beer by Janet Fletcher
Cheese and Beer by Janet Fletcher

 

More approachable than cheese and wine, but more refined than wings and beer, Janet Fletcher’s "Cheese and Beer" provides a comprehensive guide to pairing artisan cheese with craft beer. Follow Fletcher’s advice to build your own cheese platter, or choose one of her themed platters to make entertaining (and celebrating!) a snap.

 

Buy "Cheese and Beer" here!

 

 

Cookies and Beer by Jonathan Bender
Cookies and Beer by Jonathan Bender

 

Perfect for the drinker with a baking problem (or the baker with a beer tooth), "Cookies and Beer" is the first cookbook to bring together two things that never should have been separated in the first place. "Cookies and Beer" features dozens of cookie recipes, each with a specific craft beer pairing, as well as a more general pairing suggestion.

 

Buy your copy here.

 

Speed Bump by Dave Coverly
Speed Bump by Dave Coverly

 

As FDR said, “I think this would be a good time for a beer.” Cheers!





Congratulations to the 2015 divisional nominees for the NCS Reuben Awards!

 

 

National Cartoonist Society
National Cartoonist Society

 

 

The National Cartoonist Society has announced the nominees for the 2015 Divisional Awards, and we’re proud to announce that several GoComics creators have made the list! The Divisional Awards honor excellence in 15 different fields of cartooning, including:

 

Editorial Cartoons

Mike Luckovich

Michael Ramirez

 

Greeting Cards

Scott Nickel (Eek)

Jim Benton (Jim Benton Cartoons)

 

Magazine Feature

Rich Powell (Wide Open)

 

Newspaper Panel

Dave Whamond (Reality Check)

Scott Hilburn (Argyle Sweater)

Glenn McCoy (The Flying McCoys)

 

Newspaper Strip

Mark Tatulli (Lio)

Stephan Pastis (Pearls Before Swine)

 

Online Comics — Long 

Dave Kellett (Drive)

 

Online Comics — Short

Dave Kellett (Sheldon)

 

To add to our excitement, THREE of our creators have been nominated for the highest honor in the cartooning industry: “Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year!”

 

Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year

Lynda Barry

Stephan Pastis (Pearls Before Swine)

Hilary Price

Michael Ramirez

Mark Tatulli (Lio)



For a complete list of categories and nominees, visit http://www.reuben.org/.


Congratulations to all of our creators for this well-deserved recognition! GOOD LUCK!





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

 

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.


We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

 

AJ & Magnus  4-1-16

 

 

 

 

Buns  4-2-16

 

 

 

 

Prideland  4-2-16

 

 

 

 

 

4-3-16

 

 

 

 

The Gray Zone  4-3-16

 

 

 

 

Aaron Guile  4-4-16

 

 

 

Girth  4-4-16

 

 

 

 

Onion & Pea  4-4-16

 

 

 

 

 

Spaceport 51  4-4-16

 

 

 

 

 4-4-16

 

 

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 

 





New Comic Alert! Eyebeam by Sam Hurt

 

Eyebeam by Sam Hurt
Eyebeam by Sam Hurt

 

Eyebeam is a long-running strip that embraces the surreal. The title character is a sarcastic, rail-thin attorney prone to spontaneous hallucinations. His girlfriend, Sally, is an assertive, fun-loving artist with hair that often extends infinitely into the past. The strip has been through phases as a character-driven saga with soap opera-like plot twists, as well as stand-alone strips and single-panel gags. Eyebeam is always attempting to explore the absurdity of existence through the uniquely elastic reality of the cartoon medium.

 

Read Eyebeam here!





Celebrate National Humor Month with new releases from Andrews McMeel Publishing!

Everyone knows April Fools' Day is dedicated to jokes, pranks and general tomfoolery, but why should the fun stop there? April is National Humor Month, and we know just how to celebrate: With new comics collections from our publishing division.

 

From old favorites to new stars, there’s enough on this list to keep you laughing all month long.

 

1. Unicorn vs. Goblins: Another Phoebe and Her Unicorn Adventure by Dana Simpson

 

 Unicorn vs. Goblins: Another Phoebe and Her Unicorn Adventure by Dana Simpson
Unicorn vs. Goblins: Another Phoebe and Her Unicorn Adventure by Dana Simpson

 

Phoebe and Marigold take on summer camp, an estranged sister and the goblin queen in this third collection of the critically acclaimed Phoebe and Her Unicorn comic strip from AMP! Comics for Kids. Get it here.

 


2. Big Nate: Thunka, Thunka, Thunka by Lincoln Peirce

 

Big Nate: Thunka, Thunka, Thunka by Lincoln Peirce
Big Nate: Thunka, Thunka, Thunka by Lincoln Peirce

 


It’s a big year for Big Nate — the strip is celebrating its 25th anniversary, and it’s only getting better with age. Big Nate: Thunka, Thunka, Thunka, the latest Big Nate collection, is available now. Order your copy here.

 

 

3. Adulthood Is a Myth: A "Sarah’s Scribbles" Collection by Sarah Andersen

 

Adulthood Is a Myth: A "Sarah's Scribbles" Collection by Sarah Andersen
Adulthood Is a Myth: A "Sarah's Scribbles" Collection by Sarah Andersen

 

The debut collection of the wildly popular (and strikingly relatable) Sarah’s Scribble's webcomic will make you laugh so hard you’ll forget all about those pesky bills and responsibilities. Order it here.

 

 

4. Fowl Language: Welcome to Parenting by Brian Gordon

 

Fowl Language: Welcome to Parenting by Brian Gordon
Fowl Language: Welcome to Parenting by Brian Gordon

 

In Fowl LanguageBrian Gordon offers an unvarnished look at the trials and tribulations of parenting two young children. Both heartwarming and irreverent, Fowl Language: Welcome to Parenting provides humorous takes on everything from navigating kid-centric holidays to dealing with picky eaters. Get your copy here.

 

5. Snoopy: Party Animal by Charles Schulz

Snoopy: Party Animal by Charles Schulz
Snoopy: Party Animal by Charles Schulz


A kid-friendly Peanuts collection, Snoopy: Party Animal follows everyone’s favorite cartoon beagle through various misadventures, including run-ins with Linus and Lucy, a snowman, and... a cat? Good grief! Order yours here.

 

 

6. Some Clever Title: A FoxTrot Collection Blah Blah Blah by Bill Amend

 

Some Clever Title: A FoxTrot Collection Blah Blah Blah by Bill Amend
Some Clever Title: A FoxTrot Collection Blah Blah Blah by Bill Amend

 

 

The Fox family is at it again in the latest FoxTrot collection, which examines pop culture from the perspective of an average family and offers a fresh and witty take on society. A must-have for any seasoned or new FoxTrot fan, Some Clever Title is available right here.





Meet Your Creator: Brian Gordon (Fowl Language)

MYC_blog_header

 

The GoComics “Meet Your Creator” series brings you firsthand insight into the lives and careers of your favorite cartoonists. Each week, we hand over the keys to one of our talented creators, who share their inspirations, achievements, creative processes, studios and more! Read on to hear from this week’s featured cartoonist: Brian Gordon of Fowl Language   

 

 

Fowl Language by Brian Gordon
 

 

It was at the tender age of 6 that I decided I’d be a cartoonist. I don’t think my parents thought much of it at the time, since kids wanna be all sorts of crazy things when they grow up. But unlike my friends, who quickly realized how hard it was to actually become a superhero or a princess, I never really wised up.

 

Shy and uncoordinated, I spent an inordinate amount of time as a kid indoors. One of my favorite indoor activities was drawing pictures from the comic pages of our newspaper. With zero interest in learning to hit or catch a ball, I had lots of free time to practice drawing Snoopy.

 

What really sealed the vocational deal for me, though, was an interview I saw on TV with the creator of Peanuts, Charles Schulz. He seemed really nice and looked like he was having a lot of fun at his job. So, I decided at that moment that I’d become a cartoonist, too.

 

Throughout my school career, I would pick and choose what subjects I’d actually pay attention to based on the simple question, “Does a cartoonist need to know this?” Looking back on my high school transcripts, I can tell you that more often than not, my answer was “no.” It’s a shame I can’t go back in time and tell my former self that, yes, actually, even cartoonists have the occasional use for math.

 

 

Fowl Language by Brian Gordon Fowl Language by Brian Gordon

 

 

 

Somehow, I was able to graduate and even go on to art college. And once I got my degree, I went on to make tens upon tens of dollars as a freelance illustrator. I was poor as hell, but I was determined to make a living as an artist, so I enrolled in a graduate art program. My intention was to teach, but through the program, I stumbled into a summer internship at Hallmark Cards that turned into an honest-to-goodness, real art job.

 

My intention was to stay a year or two, become a famous cartoonist, and leave the Midwest with all my riches. Eighteen years later, not famous and barely much richer, I was laid off by the card company.

 

With few other prospects of full-time employment as an illustrator, I decided to devote all my attention to the webcomic I had been drawing in my spare time, called Fowl Language. It was an autobiographical cartoon depicting my life as a flawed parent, and, while I never got the wealth I hoped for, I did have two beautiful, whip-smart, often quite irritating children to draw inspiration from.

 

 

Fowl Language by Brian Gordon

 

 

Within months of devoting myself full-time to the comic, its popularity exploded. In fact, a collection of Fowl Language cartoons appeared in an Upworthy post and ended up being the fourth-most shared content on all of Facebook in 2015.

 

In addition to the popularity, the first collection of my work came out in book form on March 22nd.

 

 

Fowl Language by Brian Gordon

 

 

It’s been a bumpy ride, and I still suck at math, but I’m so happy to see my crazy dream finally coming true.

 

Want more Fowl Language?

 

• Read on GoComics here.

• Snag a copy of “Fowl Language: Welcome to Parenting” here.

• Follow along on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.





15 Years of Frazz Comics

April 2 marks the 15th anniversary of Jef Mallett's FrazzEditor Kendra Phipps shares reflects on this milestone:

 

Please join me in saying HAPPY 15 YEARS TO FRAZZ!! 

 

Is 15 years the “golden” anniversary? No? Well, it should be. Frazz is the golden-haired, gold-record-writing janitor with a heart of you-know-what. The strip was created by the equally golden-hearted (though less golden-haired) Jef Mallett, and I have been lucky enough to be Jef’s editor for three years now. 

 

I can’t improve on Jef’s words (he’s blogged for us here before: http://blogs.gocomics.com/2013/07/meet-your-creator-jef-mallett-frazz.html), so I’ll let him share some thoughts on the strip.

 

On why he writes such intellectual dialogue in a comic strip:

"Before the funny pages, I worked other newspaper jobs, and it drove me crazy that some people in the business still seemed to think we should write down to some kind of lowest common denominator. … By the time I created Frazz, I was a little older and a little secure and a whole lot of stubborn, and I decided I was going to draw with the assumption that my readers were a little more ambitious. … I do have the smartest readers in the comics. And they keep me on my toes, pointing out the errors I inevitably make. I’m not nearly as smart as my characters, or my readers. But I’m every bit as curious, so I keep getting smarter. The hard way."

 

Related: Why your favorite word is about to be “Callipygian”:

"One of the happiest days of my career was when I drew a strip where Caulfield was filling out a form and didn’t know what to put for his race; like most Americans, he’s a bit of his own personal melting pot. Frazz suggests he write that he’s Callipygian. But the thing is, I deliberately didn’t explain what it meant. Other than the few readers who knew, people were going to have to look it up, and when they did, it was going to make their day. And they did, and it did. Best word ever. What? No, I’m not going to say what it is here. Look it up."

 

(The strip in question.)

 

On how he comes up with enough jokes and stories to fill 365 comics per year:

"You simply can’t just make up that much material. You have to steal it from life. And if you’re going to do that, you’d better do everything you can to have the most interesting life possible. That’s its own Faustian bargain, but it’s one that suits me."

 

On what keeps him going:

"It’s exhausting; drawing the strip takes so much time and energy, and the way I make my life interesting involves a lot of exercise. It’s a tricky, even desperate, balance. But as with most balancing acts, slowing down only makes it harder, and if you stop, you’re toast. Most of what keeps me going is pure joy. I love this life."

 

 

It shows, Jef… Thank you for giving your readers so much to love on the comics page!

 

If you don’t already follow Frazz on GoComics, get your callipygian self over there and fix that. It’s SO great. Here are a few of my Frazz Faves:

 

 

An early Easter strip, blending redemption and Peeps (as one does).

 

Frazz by Jef Mallett
Frazz by Jef Mallett

 

 

Toilet humor! It’s not ALL intellectual, thank goodness.

 

Frazz by Jef Mallett
Frazz by Jef Mallett

 

 

The "Mrs. Olsen saves the day” arc! It starts here, and continues off and on into the fall. Read the whole storyline to see how the town rallies to reward Mrs. Olsen for her good deed.

 

Frazz by Jef Mallett
Frazz by Jef Mallett

 

 

From that arc: Mrs. Olsen in Spandex. Comedy gold.

 

Frazz by Jef Mallett
Frazz by Jef Mallett

 

 

And one more random favorite, because cats.

  

Frazz by Jef Mallett
Frazz by Jef Mallett

 

 

Once again, a very happy 15th to the golden boy!

-Kendra

 

Explore the Frazz archive here!





Watch Your Back — It’s April Fools’ Day!

Happy April Fools’ Day! The pranks, gags and jokes are out in full force today. Just setting foot outside your front door puts you at risk for rogue tomfoolery.

 

Pranker or prankee, there’s always a chance your jest will backfire. Luckily, we have some tips for avoiding April Fools’ Day fallout.


1. Never prank someone in a position of authority.

Grand Avenue by Steve Breen and Mike Thompson
Grand Avenue by Steve Breen and Mike Thompson



2. Be mindful of possible repercussions.

Drabble by Kevin Fagan
Drabble by Kevin Fagan



3. Avoid joking about the important things.

Sunny Street by Max Garcia and Sandra Barthauer
Sunny Street by Max Garcia and Sandra Barthauer



4. Try not to make the same mistake twice.

Nest Heads by John Allen
Nest Heads by John Allen



5. And finally, save confessions for April 2.

FoxTrot by Bill Amend
FoxTrot by Bill Amend



For more gags and giggles, check out our April Fools’ Day collection!





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.


We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

 

BigJim 3-29-16

 

 

 

3-29-16

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Boobiehatch  3-29-16

 

 

 

3-29-16

 

 

 

 

Weasel Ink  3-29-16

 

 

 

 

Sharp Curve Comics  3-30-16

 

 

3-31-16

 

 

 

 

Girth  3-31-16

 

 

 

 

Magnificatz  3-31-16

 

 

 

 

3-30+31-16

 

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 

 

 





6 Things We Love About Spring

Ah, spring. The hills are alive with the crack of baseball bats, the sweet perfume of blooming flowers, and the gentle caress of spring rain.

 

There’s a lot to love about spring, and we’ve rounded up a list of our six favorite things!


1. It’s a time for reinvention and new beginnings.


Luann by Greg Evans
Luann by Greg Evans



2. Baseball season begins!


Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce
Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce



3. Whether windy or wet, the weather is always interesting.


Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson



4. The fresh, clean smell.

 

Adam@Home by Rob Harrell
Adam@Home by Rob Harrell



5. Everything bursts with color.


Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz



6. The days are perfect for gardening.

 

Garfield by Jim Davis
Garfield by Jim Davis

 


Hopefully we’ve put a little “spring” in your step today!





GIVEAWAY: Molly and the Bear Prize Pack

 Attention, Molly and the Bear fans! In case you missed it, the very first Molly and the Bear book hit store shelves a few weeks ago.

 

To celebrate this awesome achievement by creator Bob Scott, we’re giving away a Molly and the Bear prize pack, including a SIGNED copy of the Molly and the Bear book, an ORIGINAL signed comic strip and an adorable Bear plush!

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

This contest will end on April 5, 2016, at 12 a.m. CT. We will randomly select one winner and notify the winner via email on April 5, 2016.

 

Can’t wait to get your paws on the book? Order "Molly and the Bear" here. And read Molly and the Bear on GoComics right here.

 

The next giveaway will be announced on April 6, 2016 at 6 a.m. CT.





It’s a Home Run, Charlie Brown!

Since Peanuts’ debut in 1950, good ol’ Charlie Brown’s trials and tribulations on the baseball diamond have delighted comics fans of all ages.

 

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

 

After decades of losing seasons, terrible pitches and misplaced optimism, Charlie Brown made history 23 years ago today.

 

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

 

On March 30, 1993, Charlie Brown hit his first home run!

 

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

 

Congratulations, Charlie Brown!


Click here for more baseball misadventures from the Peanuts gang!





Read Comics, Learn Spanish!

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

 

Comics are more than just funny doodles. Comics provide inspiration, entertainment and relevant commentary, and can even act as powerful educational resources.

 

FluentU, an online language-learning tool, highlighted GoComics recently in a blog post about using comics to learn Spanish:

 

The GoComics site has a variety of comics in Spanish, and with their smartphone apps you can have easy access to a daily dose of your favorites – free, if you don’t mind the ads. Several longtime favorites like Garfield, Dilbert, Calvin and Hobbes and Peanuts are available.”

 

In addition to Spanish translations of funny-page staples, we have a number of native Spanish-language comics, such as Gaturro and Tutelandia. According to FluentU, reading comics originally written in Spanish is a great way to “be introduced to cultural information from the cartoon’s home country.”

 

@PablandoMucho


Head on over to “GoComics en Español” and give it a try!





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

 

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.


We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

3-25-16

 

 

 

All In Good Time  3-25-16

 

 

 

 

Kate the Great  3-25-16

 

 

 

 

3-25-16

 

 

 

 

Weasel Ink 3-26-16

 

 

 

 

And now...  3-28-16

 

 

 

 

Batch Rejection 3-28-16

 

 

 

 

 

Girth  3-28-16

 

 

 

 

 

Green Pieces  3-28-16

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 





New Comics on GoComics

Enter this week's GoComics giveaway!

Meet Your GoComics Creator: A behind-the-scenes glimpse into the lives of our talented creators.





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