GoComics A to Z, Vol. 23: Leigh Luna Comics

A weekly feature spotlighting new & unusual features on the GoComics A-Z roster

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Feature: Clementine Fox (Leigh Luna Comics)
Creator: Leigh Luna
Format: large format
Frequency: every Monday
Recommended if you like: Fairy tales & adventures stories, The Chronicles of Narnia, Watership Down, Rupert Bear, A Midsummer Night's Dream

 

Because I have two small children, I spend a lot of time reading illustrated children's books (OK, I admit I owned many of them years before having kids. It's a great genre!). One of our favorite series is "Rupert," the British illustrated children's stories featuring the adventures of a bear and his various animal and fairy tale friends. The stories begin innocently enough, with something unusual happening in the house, backyard or village, but within a few pages you're swept up on some kind of adventure featuring mysterious villains, friendly fairies, and imaginative, unfamiliar environments. Leigh Luna's "Clementine Fox" adventure has all of those elements, and before I had finished reading the very first comic, I knew I'd be looking through the entire adventure, which updates every Monday. Each installment is about the equivalent of the page in a large comic/children's book, but the detail, shading and perspective in Luna's black-and-white illustrations gives them a life and depth that makes them each feel like an illustrated episode that you can spend some time with. (The strip occasionally breaks into color as well, such as the month of December 2014).

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The perspective in these strips is usually focused on the characters, but it occasionally opens up to wide vistas of the forests and hillside, heightening the sense that you're on an epic journey. Clementine Fox, Penelope Rabbit and Nubbins the Squirrel are a fun trio to cheer on, and the characters they meet along the way are entertaining as well. The dialogue isn't especially wordy or complex, (sometimes there are no words at all) but I've found the strip is best enjoyed if you take your time and read through them slowly. Oh yeah, and Nubbin' penchant for turning acorns into a sippable refreshment is pretty cool as well. I'm looking forward to accompanying this crew on future adventures, and to keeping up with the work of this enormously talented cartoonist.

 

Read more Leigh Luna Comics right here on GoComics.

 

 





"Fowl Language: Welcome to Parenting" Available for Preorder

Fowl Language Welcome to Parenting by Brian Gordon

 

 

“Parenting can be joyous and fulfilling, but it’s also often hard and gross.” Sound familiar? You’re not alone, as Brian Gordon’s Fowl Language is here to show.

 

An unvarnished look at the tedium and aggravation of parenting, with the never-fading love for our children, Fowl Language pokes fun at the daily struggles faced by parents, helping us to feel less alone in our continual struggle to stay sane.

 

Our publishing division is releasing “Fowl Language: Welcome to Parenting” in March, and we’re hearing shouts of excitement from our friends at Adweek and Upworthy!

 

 

Fowl Language by Brian Gordon

 

 

Preorder “Fowl Language: Welcome to Parenting” here. Read Fowl Language on GoComics here.





Giveaway: "Adulthood is a Myth" by Sarah Andersen

Adulthood is a Myth by Sarah Andersen

 

We’re thrilled for the March 8 release of Sarah Andersen’s “Adulthood is a Myth!”

 

If you follow Sarah’s Scribbles, you’re already familiar with Andersen’s hilarious, all-too-true comics depicting life as a young adult. “Adulthood is a Myth” is a collection of some of these amazing comics, PLUS many brand-new ones!

 

As we eagerly await the release, we’re giving away one copy of “Adulthood is a Myth” before it hits shelves!

 

To enter, leave a comment on this blog post with a link to the Sarah’s Scribbles cartoon on GoComics that you find the most relatable – browse the archive here. To be counted, you must include your first and last name or handle.

 

This contest will end Tues., Jan. 26 at 10 a.m. CT. One winner will be randomly selected and announced that day on the GoComics blog.

 

Are you as excited as we are? Pre-order a copy of “Adulthood is a Myth” here.





4 Frightening Sights of Winter

Dog Eat Doug by Brian Anderson
Dog Eat Doug by Brian Anderson

 

 

As if the chilly winter air isn’t cold enough to do the trick, these winter sightings will send a shiver down your spine:

 

 

1. Gorgeous-gone-grungy snowmen.

 

 

Buni by Ryan Pagelow
Buni by Ryan Pagelow

 

 

Buni by Ryan Pagelow
Buni by Ryan Pagelow



 

2. Two words: Snow Goons.

 

 

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

 

3. Think nosy neighbors are bad? Try snowsy neighbors.

 

 

Garfield by Jim Davis
Garfield by Jim Davis

 

 

4. The most frightening of all – the angry, weathered-by-winter snow shoveler.

 

 

The Flying McCoys by Glenn and Gary McCoy
The Flying McCoys by Glenn and Gary McCoy

 

See more eerie spottings – view our “Mythical Creatures” collection here.





Giveaway: Signed Tank McNamara Print – Winner Announced

Tank McNamara by Bill Hinds

 

Thank you to all who entered to win an archive-quality, SIGNED Tank McNamara print by sharing your favorite Tank McNamara comic from 2015.

 

We've randomly selected one winner who named the September 25 comic strip as his favorite! Congratulations, Mike Herman! Please contact us at rewards@gocomics.com with your shipping address and phone number. Please note: You must contact us by 1/26/16 or your prize will be forfeited.

 

There's still time to submit your nomination for the "Sports Jerk of the Year" Award! Find instructions here.

 

Stay tuned! The next giveaway will be announced on 1/20/16 at 6 a.m. CT.





Unleash Your Creativity With GoComics Fan Art This Month!

Are you riding the wave of inspiration? We hope the answer is “YES!” because we want you to join us in celebrating International Creativity Month! Whether you’re a professional artist or an avid doodler, let’s get those creative juices flowing this January, because …

 

Channel your inner cartoonist and pay homage to ours, by creating a rendition of your favorite characters/scenes from GoComics. Once your masterpiece is complete, share it publicly on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, using the hashtag: #GCFanArt and you could win an archive-quality print of your favorite comic on GoComics. One lucky winner will be announced on the aforementioned social networks on Sunday, Jan 31.

 

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To see more stellar fan art examples, visit gocomics.com/fan-art!





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.


We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

 

1-15-16

 

 

 

 

Minihahas  1-15-16

 

 

 

 

Dysconnected  1-17-16

 

 

 

 

View from the Couch  1-17-16

 

 

 

Batch Rejection  1-18-16

 

 

 

 

 

1-18-16

 

 

 

1-18-16

 

 

 

 

Smith  1-18-16

 

 

 

Something about Celeste  1-18-16

 

 

 

 

 

Zombie Heights  1-18-16

 

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 

 





ICYMI: Prickly City Podcast Now on Rivet Radio

Can’t get enough Carmen and Winslow? You’re in luck, because creator Scott Stantis’ Prickly City Podcast is back by popular demand on Rivet Radio! Hear from Stantis himself, and get the inside scoop on Prickly City by listening online, or downloading the Rivet Radio app

 

 





New Comic Alert! The Worried Well by Dana Maier

The Worried Well by Dana Maier

 

 

Dana Jeri Maier's comics provide useful advice, philosophical musings and spot-on witticisms. She shows us ourselves, not unkindly, as silly and vain and self-involved. Her cartoons feel very interior, a mind watching the world and muttering to itself. They're what that person standing by themselves at the party, not talking to anyone, pretending to look vaguely interested in nothing in particular, has been secretly thinking the whole time.

 

Read The Worried Well here.





Let Freedom Ring: Cartoonists Celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Joe Heller by Joe Heller
Joe Heller by Joe Heller

 

Today, we honor minister, activist and visionary Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., for his unwavering commitment to making the world a better place. He once said, “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.” As someone who dared to dream of peace and equality for all, despite the prejudices he faced as an African-American, Dr. King was the true embodiment of a leader.

 

Below is a collection of thought-provoking, sentimental and humorous comics honoring Martin Luther King Jr.:

 

Nancy by Guy Gilchrist
Nancy by Guy Gilchrist

 

Frazz by Jef Mallett
Frazz by Jef Mallett

 

Connie to the Wonnie by Connie Sun
Connie to the Wonnie by Connie Sun

 

Grand Avenue by Steve Breen and Mike Thompson
Grand Avenue by Steve Breen and Mike Thompson

 

View the full collection of tributes to Martin Luther King Jr. here.





Happy Kid Inventors Day (K.I.D.)!

Kid Inventors Day is celebrated every year on January 17: the birthday of one of America’s all-time greatest inventors, Benjamin Franklin, who began dreaming up designs at the mere age of 12! Franklin isn’t the only child whose inventions changed our world. Many of today’s most popular gizmos and gadgets – like television, earmuffs and the Popsicle, to name a few – were all thought up by kids.

 

Today, we’re celebrating the ingenuity and creativity of children by honoring some of GoComics’ very own wise-beyond-their-years kid inventors.

 

As Thatababy reminds us, one of the most important qualities in any inventor is the ability to put a new, innovative twist(y straw) on average things.

 

Thatababy by Paul Trap
Thatababy by Paul Trap

 

Like Calvin, many young geniuses are often misunderstood and ahead of their time.

 

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

The best part of being an inventor is using your brainpower to do some good in the world:

 

Lio by Mark Tatulli
Lio by Mark Tatulli

 

And to help you further your goals (like Nate’s goal of getting a girlfriend):

 

Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce
Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce

 

Then comes the truly fun part: getting to sell your finished product:

 

FoxTrot by Bill Amend
FoxTrot by Bill Amend

 

For more inspiration and fun for kids, check out these two innovative reads from our publishing division:

 

Candy Experiments by Loralee Leavitt
Candy Experiments by Loralee Leavitt

 

Sneaky Uses for Everyday Things by Cy Tymony
Sneaky Uses for Everyday Things by Cy Tymony

 





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.


We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 


 Cleo and Company  1-12-16

 

 

Don't Pick the Flowers  1-12-16

 

 

 

1-12-16

 

 


 

 

Onion & Pea  1-13-16

 

 

 

 

Picpak Dog  1-13-16

 


 

AJ & Magnus  1-14-16

 

 

 

 

BigJim  1-14-16

 

 

1-14-16

 

 

 

No Ambiguity  1-14-16

 

 

 

 

Oscar and Annie  1-14-16

 

 

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 

 





Meet Your Creator: Carl Skanberg (That New Carl Smell)

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The GoComics “Meet Your Creator” series brings you firsthand insight into the lives and careers of your favorite cartoonists. Each week, we hand over the keys to one of our talented creators, who share their inspirations, achievements, creative processes, studios and more! Read on to hear from this week’s featured cartoonist: Carl Skanberg of That New Carl Smell.

 

Let me explain. I have noticed how “Carl” is a funny name to a lot of you: Commercials, TV neighbors, blue-collar nobodies, Gary Larson comics, idiot relatives, dopey cops. Basically, when a writer is thinking of the dullest, most unimpressive, dumb-guy name, “Carl” is a common choice. I’ve noticed. Don’t think I haven’t noticed. But I’m taking it back! I decided to name all of the dumb guys “Carl” in my comic. I’m going to saturate the comedy market with Carl. Someday, it’ll be uncool to make jokes about Carl. I mean, unless your name is Carl, like me. Then it’ll still be cool. Clearly.   

 

 

2 Broke Gulls by Carl Skanberg        Fantasy by Carl Skanberg

 

 

I was four years old, drawing pictures at my Grandma’s kitchen table, and I made a picture of a worm on roller skates. A short time after that, the Chicago Sun-Times published a Ziggy cartoon of a worm on roller skates. Everyone was blown away. “Holy cats, Carl has the potential to be a real cartoonist! He drew his roller skate worm before Ziggy!” I felt pretty good and I learned an important lesson that day: Being a newspaper cartoonist is as easy as drawing a worm on roller skates that you saw on Sesame Street. Until now, I never spoiled the myth about my worm on roller skates originally appearing on Sesame Street. Making a living with doodles from the kitchen table may be a myth, as well.

 

 

Worm - Carl Skanberg

 

 

I have a really bad doodling habit. If you see me in a social setting and I look awkward, it’s because I don’t know what to do with my hands and brain without a pencil and paper in my hand. All through my school days and into my life as a grownup, everyone knows me as the guy who is always drawing. I work in the printing and marketing industry, but I have a job that has very little to do with doodling. I’ve worked for the same fine company for more than 18 years. I’m 40 years old, I’m married, I have four kids and did I mention I’m a fully grown man with a sketchbook? I ride the rush-hour train, in the big city of Chicago, and I openly draw pictures of funny cartoon animals and interestingly shaped people, for no good reason. 

 

My first newspaper comic strip was published in Illinois State University’s student paper. It was a simple comic featuring a bear and bird and some other animals. There was no big concept. The bear and bird told a ton of bad jokes and got punched in the face a lot. The cartoon was named Best Cartoon or Panel by the Illinois College Press Association in 1996. I drew it for a couple years at school and for a semester after graduation. People seemed to like it, but the comic syndicates had very little interest. I decided to end that strip and attempt a new comic that might catch the eye of a newspaper syndicate. Every year between 1998 to 2005, roughly one new fully realized comic idea was rejected by all newspaper and syndicate professionals who saw my work.

 

My friends and coworkers continued to enjoy these unpublished comics, so I decided to create a webcomic for this smaller group. The Chicago White Sox had just won the 2005 World Series and everyone was pretty excited about it. My new cartoon became a serial comic strip story that followed the ups and downs of the White Sox throughout the 2006 season. I cast the White Sox as a band of pirates who battled other pirate crews (the Pittsburgh Pirates were a baseball team) on their quest for more gold. Before the real White Sox got out of spring training, I was contacted by a local newspaper in the Chicago suburbs, and they wanted to run my comic in their sports section. Around the same time, the VP of acquisitions at Universal Press Syndicate contacted me to ask if I’d ever thought about creating a comic for syndication. I said, “Yes. I’ve thought about it. In fact, I have a bunch of rejection letters on your letterhead.” He said, “Well. The White Sox aren’t popular enough for syndication, but keep me in mind as you come up with other things.”

 

 

Palehose Six by Carl Skanberg

 

 

I followed the White Sox, in serial story mode, for three seasons. After they were pirates, they were space travelers in 2007 and they were a Quixotic band of knights in 2008. I self-published a book with these comics in 2009, and quickly sold all of them. Beyond the White Sox stories, the newspaper published my weekly panel, “Smells Like Mascot,” to cover all Chicago sports. In 2013, the local suburban newspaper eliminated most of their budget for unique sports content, and “Smells Like Mascot” went with it. I soon started creating a daily non-sports comic panel for a general audience, and I got back in touch with my friend at Universal Press Syndicate. He thought the new comics were a good fit for GoComics, and That New Carl Smell was born.

 

 

That New Carl Smell by Carl Skanberg

 

 

On a side note, I was the Illinois State University mascot, Reggie Redbird, for a couple years. I know the smell of a mascot. The smells sticks with ya.

 

The recent stretch of seven years as a newspaper cartoonist was good for consistency and sticking to deadlines. Creating a webcomic is the opposite. I’d like to thank all of the people who follow my work at GoComics, and I apologize for going into weird patterns. The first few months of That New Carl Smell was a daily comic that would fit in a newspaper, but it was not in a newspaper. So, then, what the heck is a webcomic? There was a stretch when the comic was drawn on 4” x 6” cards and I physically mailed them to friends, as postcards, because I thought it was most important for friends to have tangible art. Then, I painted some comics with acrylic paint on wood, and some in watercolor, and some in gouache. I’ve taken a lot of photos of my comics, rather than scanning them, to take a step away from the digital version of the art. I hope all of these experiments are more entertaining than annoying. Thanks for sticking around. I have not figured it out, yet. And I don’t think I can kick my doodling habit.

 

 

Carl Skanberg      Carl Skanberg

 

 

Carl Skanberg
My workspace is wherever I can find it. This is my kitchen table, with my kids.

 

Read That New Carl Smell here. Follow Carl on Twitter here. And, check out Carl’s blog.





ICYMI: Twitter Q&A with Wes Molebash (Molebashed)

Molebashed

 

We’d like to thank Wes Molebash, creator of Molebashedfor taking the time out of his Friday to chat with fans! If you missed today’s live Twitter Q&A with Wes, you can catch up on the fun, hereor scroll through the tweets below:

 

 

Click here to follow Molebashed!

 

Next up (Friday, Jan. 22): Don’t miss your chance to chat live with T. Shepherd, the creator behind one the funniest feline comics around, Snow Sez!

 





6 Comic Characters You’ll Rarely See Without a Hat

Hang on to your hats, comic fans, because today (Jan. 15) is National Hat Day! To top off the festivities, we’re bringing you a fedorable assortment of funnies, highlighting 6 characters you’ll rarely see without their trademark headgear:

 

Our hats are off to Andy Capp, whose signature chapeau has been glued to his head since 1957, throughout all of his hilarious misadventures.

 

Andy Capp by Reg Smythe
Andy Capp by Reg Smythe

 

Even the most dastardly villains are no match for heroic detective Dick Tracy, as he dons his famous yellow fedora.

 

Dick Tracy by Joe Staton and Mike Curtis
Dick Tracy by Joe Staton and Mike Curtis

 

The Wizard of Id never casts a spell without his pointed cap: source of both his magical powers and classic style.

 

Wizard of Id by Parker and Hart
Wizard of Id by Parker and Hart

 

Like the Wiz, Broom Hilda never leaves the kingdom without her magical topper, but points to her for changing it up every now and then.

 

Broom Hilda by Russell Myers
Broom Hilda by Russell Myers

 

Pope Francis may be required to wear his Pileolus, but all the same, he knows he rocks it (hence, his famous selfies).

 

Francis by Patrick J. Marrin
Francis by Patrick J. Marrin

 

Peter FoxTrot rarely does anything without his hallmark ball cap. In fact, this is one of the only times we’ve ever seen his hair:

 

FoxTrot by Bill Amend
FoxTrot by Bill Amend

 

Can you think of any hat-loving characters that we missed? Comment below.

 





GoComics A to Z, Vol. 22: The Adventures of Business Cat

A weekly feature spotlighting new & unusual features on the GoComics A-Z roster

 

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Feature: Business Cat
Creator: Tom Fonder
Format: strip
Frequency: Mondays
Recommended if you like: Feline CEOs

 

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The main character in this weekly office comedy is an authoritative, well-dressed, mostly dignified business executive. Nothing out of the ordinary, really, except for the small fact that he just happens to be a cat. It's a pretty simple premise, but with seemingly countless permutations that never fail to amuse. Instead of an ordinary mansion, Business Cat lives in a giant, modernist cat play structure. He uses his stature to order a new copy machine, then throws it out and uses the box as a play fort. While his colleagues are diligently working, he sneaks up, swats them with an open paw and then darts away. Basically, he does everything you or I might want to do in an office setting, except his feline nature gives him an excuse. Somehow, in spite of it all, Business Cat still seems believable as an executive. Maybe it's his massive chest and impressive suit, or his permanently stoic expression. Or maybe we just give him a pass because, in spite of his interspecial identity, Business Cat is human, all too human. After reading through the archives, I can understand why The Adventures of Business Cat has inspired fan translations in different languages and spontaneous Biz Cat costuming in countries far and wide. Creator Tom Fonder's art and writing is right on the money, with uncluttered artwork, economical writing and great use of silent panels. Plus, it's just one hell of a character.

 

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Read more The Adventures of Business Cat cartoons every day on GoComics. 





7 Woes and Wows of Working Out

With the new year comes New Year’s resolutions, and oftentimes, these goals are fitness related. From burning off a few pounds gained during the holiday season to building biceps to battle a bodybuilder, we’re weeks into the New Year, and gymgoers are well on the way to success!

 

For those of you who have gym-related resolutions this year –

 

Whether you’re brand new to the gym or getting back into the swing after a break ...

 

 

Glasbergen Cartoons by Randy Glasbergen
Glasbergen Cartoons by Randy Glasbergen

 

 

... You’ll find yourself working through the woes and wows of a new workout routine:

 

 

1. Exercise equipment is foreign and frightening.

 

 

Promises, Promises by J.R. Faulkner
Promises, Promises by J.R. Faulkner

 

 

2. Trying out new-to-you equipment doesn’t always go as planned.

 

 

Nancy by Guy Gilchrist
Nancy by Guy Gilchrist


 

3. You discover what motivates you.

 

 

That Monkey Tune by Michael A. Kandalaft
That Monkey Tune by Michael A. Kandalaft

 

 

4. Two words: sore muscles.

 

 

For Better or For Worse by Lynn Johnston
For Better or For Worse by Lynn Johnston

 

 

5. Friends and family members recognize your efforts.

 

 

Lola by Todd Clark
Lola by Todd Clark

 

 

6. Your wardrobe changes.

 

 

From the Mo Willems Sketchbook by Mo Willems
From the Mo Willems Sketchbook by Mo Willems

 

 

7. You’re proud of your progress.

 

 

Garfield by Jim Davis
Garfield by Jim Davis

 

 

To our comic-reading, hardworking gymgoers – we applaud you! Keep up the good work!

 

Give your abs a workout by laughing at more exercise-related funnies! Hit the GoComics in the Gym collection here.





Giveaway: Signed Tank McNamara Print

Sports Jerk of the Year - Bill Hinds
 

Where is all the “BOO-ing” coming from? Sports fans casting their votes for the biggest offenders in the world of sports! Nominations are now open for the annual Tank McNamara “Sports Jerk of the Year” Award!

 

Normally an award is something to be proud of, but, as Tank McNamara co-creator Bill Hinds says, “The ‘Tank McNamara Sports Jerk of the Year’ Award is not really celebrating bad behavior. It’s shining the flashlight of shame on the scurrying cockroaches of sports.”

 

As we cheer for this fun event, we’re giving away an archive-quality Tank McNamara print signed by Bill Hinds!

 

To enter, leave a comment on this blog post with a link to your favorite Tank McNamara comic strip from 2015 on GoComicssearch the archive here. To be counted, you must include your first and last name or handle.

 

This contest will end Tues., Jan. 19 at 10 a.m. CT. One winner will be randomly selected and announced that day on the GoComics blog.

 

Let’s hear it – Which sports figure gets the medal for the most offensive act inside or outside of the arena? Find “Sports Jerk of the Year” Award nomination instructions here.





“Rubber Ducky, You’re the One…”

Since they first appeared on the scene in the 1800s, rubber duckies have grown to become an American icon, splish-splashing their way into the hearts of children and adults alike. In addition to their famous role as Ernie’s best friend on Sesame Street, these cute, little bath time companions have even earned themselves their own holiday – National Rubber Ducky Day (Jan. 13)!

 

To celebrate today’s occasion, we’re quacking open a bottle of bubble bath and paying homage to our fowl friends, without whom, the tub would be a lonely place.

 

After all, who else is going to fend off bath sharks?

 

 Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

And keep the sea monsters at bay?

 

JumpStart by Robb Armstrong
JumpStart by Robb Armstrong

 

Though, outside creeps are a different story…

 

Get Fuzzy by Darby Conley
Get Fuzzy by Darby Conley

 

There’s still nothing better than soakin’ up some suds with your best bath time pal.

 

Ziggy by Tom Wilson & Tom II
Ziggy by Tom Wilson & Tom II

 





Giveaway: Library of Big Nate Books – Winner Announced

Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce

 

Thank you to all who helped kick off Big Nate's 25th anniversary celebration by sharing a link to your favorite Big Nate comic strip as a chance to win the library of TWELVE Big Nate books!

 

We have randomly selected one winner! Naming the Jan. 12, 1991 strip as her favorite, Amy Guillaume Linderman is taking home:

 

• "Big Nate: Welcome to My World"

• "Big Nate: Greatest Hits"

• "Big Nate: Great Minds Think Alike"

• "Big Nate: I Can’t Take It!"

• "Big Nate: From the Top"

• "Big Nate: Game On!"

• "Big Nate: Out Loud"

• "Big Nate: Makes the Grade"

• "Big Nate: The Crowd Goes Wild"

• "Big Nate: Say Good-bye to Dork City"

• "Big Nate and Friends"

• "Nate el Grande: Hola!"

 

Congratulations, Amy! Please contact us at rewards@gocomics.com with your shipping address and phone number. Please note: You must contact us by 1/19/16 or your prize will be forfeited.

 

Stay tuned! The next giveaway will be announced on this blog on 1/13/16 at 8 a.m. CT.

 





New Comics on GoComics

Enter this week's GoComics giveaway!

Meet Your GoComics Creator: A behind-the-scenes glimpse into the lives of our talented creators.





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