Giveaway: 2015 Wall Calendars

2015-cals

 

Want to laugh your way through 2015? We can help! We’re giving away 10 wall calendars published by our sister company, Andrews McMeel Publishing!

 

Prizes include:

 

-       Dilbert 2015 Slimline Calendar

-       Pearls Before Swine Wall Calendar

-       Big Nate Wall Calendar

-       The Argyle Sweater Wall Calendar

-       WuMo Wall Calendar

 

To enter, comment on this blog post and include your FIRST and LAST names. Limit one entry per person. This contest will end Mon., January 5 at 8 a.m. CT. The winner will be announced that day on this blog. This giveaway is open to all readers worldwide.

 

Browse more 2015 calendars here.





Giveaway: Readers’ Choice – Winners Announced!

Thank you to all who participated in our readers’ choice giveaway by sharing a link to your favorite comic from 2014! We loved hearing from our fans!

 

We’ve randomly selected FIVE winners to receive an archive-quality print of their chosen comic strip!

 

1. Sarah BergerThatababy, Nov. 6

 

Thatababy by Paul Trap

 

 

2. Mary PoltePearls Before Swine, Dec. 24

 

Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis

 

 

3. Davy JonesPearls Before Swine, June 5

 

Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis

 

 

4. Curtis HoffmanEndtown, Jan. 7

 

Endtown by Aaron Neathery

 

 

5. Aurora MurrellRabbits Against Magic, Nov. 25

  Rabbits Against Magic by Jonathan Lemon

 

 

Congratulations! If your name is listed above, please email us at rewards@gocomics.com with your shipping address and phone number. Please note: You must contact us by 1/6/14 or your prize will be forfeited.





Matt Davies' 2014 Review




See all of Matt's work here http://www.gocomics.com/mattdavies





Weekend Faves (December 29)

Tiny Confessions by Christopher Rozzi
Tiny Confessions by Christopher Rozzi

I seriously can't get enough of Tiny Confessions. If you're a dog or cat lover, make sure to check it out!

--Julie

 

 

Betty by Gary Delainey and Gerry Rasmussen
Betty by Gary Delainey and Gerry Rasmussen

 Related: "Stepping Out" via The New Yorker

--Elizabeth

 

Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis
Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis

Ah, a rat after my own heart!
--Elizabeth

 

 

Biographic by Steve McGarry
Biographic by Steve McGarry

Cool list of musical milestones to listen for in 2015
--Lucas

 

Loose Parts by Dave Blazek
Loose Parts by Dave Blazek

Now we know what's contained in the redacted sections of recent CIA reports.

--Lucas





Year in Review: Top 14 Comics of 2014

As we count down to the New Year, we wanted to take a look back at some of our fans’ favorite comics of 2014. We did some digging and discovered 14 of the most-trafficked comic strips of 2014!

 

Drumroll, please…

 

 

14. Peanuts by Charles Schulz – January 19

  Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

 

13. Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce – February 1

 

Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce

 

 

 

12. Get Fuzzy by Darby Conley – April 14

 

Get Fuzzy by Darby Conley

 

 

 

11. Wizard of Id by Parker and Hart – January 14

 

Wizard of Id by Parker and Hart
 

 

10. Non Sequitur by Wiley Miller – July 27

 

 

Non Sequitur by Wiley Miller

 

 

 

9. Heavenly Nostrils by Dana Simpson – April 22

 

Heavenly Nostrils by Dana Simpson

 

 

8. Frazz by Jef Mallett – January 4

 

Frazz by Jef Mallett

 

 

 

7. Doonesbury by Garry Trudeau – June 22

 

Doonesbury by Garry Trudeau

 

 

6. Pibgorn by Brooke McEldowney – May 2

 

Pibgorn by Brooke McEldowney

 

5. 9 Chickweed Lane by Brooke McEldowney – January 1

 

9 Chickweed Lane by Brooke McEldowney

 

 

 

4. Luann by Greg Evans – June 8

 

Luann by Greg Evans

 

 

 

3. Garfield by Jim Davis – June 27

 

Garfield by Jim Davis

 

 

 

2. Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson – November 12

 

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
 


 1. Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis – June 4

 

Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis

 

 

What a great year for comics! We can’t wait to see what our talented creators bring us in 2015!





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.

 

We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

Bushy Tales  12-25-14

 

 

 

Maximus  12-25-14

 

 

 

12-25-14

 

 

 

 

12-25-14

 

 

12-26-14

 

 

 

 

Buns  12-27-14

 

 

 

 12-27-14

 

 

 

Green Pieces  12-28-14

 

 

 

12-28-14

 

 

 

12-28-14

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 

 





Meet Your Creator: Pat Marrin (Francis)

Francis, cape

Some background

 

I grew up in Minneapolis in a large family (seven kids, close in age). I shared a room with three of my brothers, our beds tightly arranged around a single desk where we took turns doing our homework. Each of us had a drawer, and I kept mostly tablets, crayons and pencils in mine. Art was my escape into a world of imagination and stories. I read a lot, had glasses and buck teeth, found that being funny was the best defense (besides having five brothers) against being picked on at school. My dad managed a small foundry and was a great storyteller, and my mom ran the house and encouraged each of us to find our own niche.

 

I went to a Catholic boarding school, drew cartoons for the student paper and was a good student. After graduation I decided to join a religious community of priests and brothers, and I stayed almost 20 years. I mostly taught high school and used storytelling and art to entertain my students. In my mid-thirties I got into the grad program on a fellowship at the University of Missouri J-school, where the dean let me focus on the political cartoon and take art classes with Frank Stack, who, besides running the art department, was an underground comic book artist. I was hooked on cartooning as the most effective, compact and portable way to communicate important ideas.

 

My first job after J-school was at a daily newspaper in Topeka, KS, as newsroom artist, political cartoonist and book editor. I got married, became a dad, taught journalism at a small college in Atchison, KS, and ended up at the National Catholic Reporter, a feisty, independent publishing company in Kansas City, MO, as an editor, reporter and illustrator. I did the political cartoon below in 1991 and the illustration for NCR in 2005.

 

Political cartoon

 

Holy Spirit

When Francis was elected pope in 2013, NCR publisher Tom Fox was so optimistic, he encouraged me to create a comic strip to celebrate this remarkable leader who was restoring hope to the Catholic church after years of paralysis and retreat from the reforms begun in the 1960s. It seemed at first a risky venture, but Francis has provided enough humor and surprises to keep my imagination in overdrive. I remind myself and others that my “Francis” is only a comic strip, perhaps short-lived as popes and comic strips go, but worth celebrating. The strip appears in NCR (ncronline.org) and, since March 2014, also on GoComics.com.

 

Francis, comic strip

 

The Process

 

I love to draw, but I am short on technical skill above the level of line art and pencil shading. My work has the rough-draft look of an amateur. I am never satisfied with a finished piece, but I resist the urge to do it over. I am a work in progress.  I admire artists who have real art training and can use line and wash to get subtle colors. If the strip survives, my goal is learn more so I can do some full Sunday frames in color. I pencil sketch, work up with Flair markers on a light table, digitize with a simple Epson scanner and finish in the Paint program on my PC.

 

Sustaining a strip based on a single character would be tough, so I created Brother Leo, a nod to an actual companion to St. Francis in the 13th century, to be the pope’s personal assistant. Leo started out as a kind of foil to generate comic situations. He is innocent and very literal, so wordplay and puns abound, though my goal is to use as few words as possible. Leo has caught on with my small audiences. Someone in the blog strings referred to him as “the little guy.” He became more real, even for me, and I now let him suggest the direction of the strip. Some readers think he is a putdown, but in fact (besides being a cartoon), he is the purest expression of the pope’s own values. Other characters will follow. I try to listen to my audience as the strip evolves.

 

The story line has emerged slowly from single three-frame gags to short series. I show everything to my wife, who doesn’t hesitate to say if she doesn’t get it (back to the drawing board) or she does, but it doesn’t work (BTTDB). For example, I did a strip in which Brother Leo, who thinks he needs to protect the pope, decides to taste all his food.  He rejects the broccoli not because it’s poisoned, but because he hates broccoli (joke). My wife volunteers at a community garden where they try to get kids to eat vegetables, so she didn’t like the message. I changed broccoli to arugula. Still doesn’t work, she said.  In the end I did three strips in order to redeem the message. I call it the “vegetable” series. 

 

Francis, arugula

 

Francis, good example

 

Francis, popeye

 

Another longer series follows when Leo brings home a stray dog that turns out to be female and pregnant. Imagine this, in the Vatican. Where there are puppies, more cartoons will follow.  

 

People at NCR come up to my office and look at everything spread out on a table, make suggestions, give me ideas. Once I get an idea, I let it sit for a while. Often ideas come when I am drawing. I start something, change it completely or start over. Adding text is the hardest. I see many artists using computer fonts, which solves the spacing issues. Yet in classic strips like George Herriman’s fabulous “Krazy Kat,” the hand-written text is part of the composition. The whole thing casts a spell that simply enchants. 

 

Work office

 

Home office

 

I draw at work in between other duties, and at home in the upstairs bedroom that our adult son reclaims when he comes home for visits. I like to be up high with windows. I waste a lot of time watching the squirrels in the backyard, but even they suggest cartoon ideas.

 

My photo will tell you that I am no beginner. I have come only gradually to try my hand as a comic strip artist after doing many other things to earn a living. I am grateful for the encouragement to come full circle almost at retirement age to fulfill a childhood dream of being a cartoonist.

 

 

Pope on bike

 

 

Kites
 

Read Francis here.





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.

 

We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

Coyoteville  12-20-14

 

 

Kartoons by Kline  12-20-14

 

 

 

 

12-21-14

 

 

 

Buns  12-21-14

 

 

 

12-22-14

 

 

 

Promises Promises  12-23-14

 

 

 

12-23-14

 

Bushy Tales  12-24-14

 

 

 

Don't Pick the Flowers 12-24-14

 

 

 

Magic Coffee Hair  12-24-14

 

 

 

 

Snow Sez... 12-24-14

 



 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 

 

 





Giveaway: Readers' Choice!

Readerschoicegiveaway[1]

 

This week, we want to hear from YOU! Leave a comment on this blog post linking to your favorite comic strip from 2014. We will randomly select FIVE winners and send them an archive-quality print of their chosen comic strip!

 

To enter, leave a comment on this blog post and include your FIRST and LAST names, as well as a link to your favorite comic strip from 2014. This contest will end on Tues., Dec. 30 at 10 a.m. CT. The winners will be announced that day on this blog. This contest is open to all readers worldwide.

 





Giveaway: Stocking Stuffer Prize Packs - Winners Announced!

StockingStufferPrizePack

Thank you to all who entered to win a Stocking Stuffer Prize Pack! We've randomly selected THREE winners!

 

Stocking Stuffer Prize Pack 1: Paige Pipitone

 

Stocking Stuffer Prize Pack 2: Brian Ponshock

 

Stocking Stuffer Prize Pack 3: Mary Arras

 

Congratulations to our winners! If your name is listed above, please contact us at rewards@gocomics.com with your shipping address and phone number. Please note: You must contact us by 12/30/14 or your prize will be forfeited.





Humor for the Holidays

Featuring gifts galore, gags about Santa, and, like the perfect cookie recipe, just the right amount of sweetness, we’ve created a collection of holiday-themed comics! Enjoy!

 

Moderately Confused by Jeff Stahler
Moderately Confused by Jeff Stahler

 

JumpStart by Robb Armstrong
JumpStart by Robb Armstrong

 

Ben by Daniel Shelton
Ben by Daniel Shelton

 

Red and Rover by Brian Basset
Red and Rover by Brian Basset

 

The Duplex by Glenn McCoy
The Duplex by Glenn McCoy

 

See more howl-inducing holiday comics here.

 

Don’t forget to spread cheer by sharing your favorite holiday comics with your friends and family!





Weekend Faves (December 21)

 

Broom Hilda by Russell Myers
Broom Hilda by Russell Myers

 

 

Don't worry, Hilda. The season for self control starts AFTER Christmas.

--Julie

 

 

FoxTrot by Bill Amend
FoxTrot by Bill Amend

 

 

I'd rather get a Christmas card like this than another matching sweater picture one.
--Elizabeth

 

 

 

Non Sequitur by Wiley Miller
Non Sequitur by Wiley Miller

An interactive comic strip? What a great idea! Looks like commenters on GoComics are happy to oblige.

--Lucas

 

 

Ziggy by Tom Wilson & Tom II
Ziggy by Tom Wilson & Tom II

 

 

Look on the bright side, Ziggy. It's definitely a SNOW DAY!

--Julie

 

Monty by Jim Meddick
Monty by Jim Meddick

Christmas carols might be the only genre of music in which a little Autotune might actually be refreshing. Hopefully Monty will get lucky and co-produce some tracks with Daft Punk in 2015.

--Lucas

 





The GoComics Naughty List

From pranking parents to sassing schoolteachers, we’ve watched GoComics characters wade into hot water throughout the year.

 

We’ve made a list and we’ve checked it twice! Presenting the 20 naughtiest moments of 2014!

 

Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

 

 

That Monkey Tune by Michael A. Kandalaft
That Monkey Tune by Michael A. Kandalaft

 

 

Ginger Meggs by Jason Chatfield
Ginger Meggs by Jason Chatfield

 

 

The Middletons by Ralph Dunagin and Dana Summers
The Middletons by Ralph Dunagin and Dana Summers

 

 

Thatababy by Paul Trap
Thatababy by Paul Trap

 

Click here to see who else landed on the Naughty List!





Meet Your Creator: Donna Lewis (Reply All, Reply All Lite)

 

“The Accidental Cartoonist”

  Wprep141021

 

I always knew I would spend my life being a writer, but I never ever considered being a cartoonist. I was the kid who was writing or reading every minute I was awake. I was the kid who finished my assignments and exams early in school so that I could get back to whatever I was reading or writing. I was the kid who found almost everything besides reading and writing to be boring and ridiculous and a waste of time.

 

I was that kid.

 

Unfortunately, I was that kid before the Internet arrived in our lives, so my access to really creative people was severely limited. I was not surrounded by creative people. I was surrounded by people with stressful day jobs and extra-income evening jobs who urged me to do whatever I wanted to do as long as it included getting an education and a job that paid a living salary.

 

So I got an education and a job. Usually I had many jobs at once, making money however I could make money. I became a lawyer because I figured being a lawyer would enable me to combine the two things I loved the most: writing and good deeds. Except that I called good deeds ‘advocacy.’ Good deeds are what you do when you’re a good person. Advocacy is what you do when you need to put your good deeds on your resume so you can get a better job.

 

For years and years, I worked as a lawyer, helping people to make their lives easier, better or more fair. I worked in the areas of disability and employment, making a difference I could actually see and a difference I cared about a little too much. At night I taught classes and tutored wannabe lawyers. In Washington DC, tutoring can easily support a fledgling law practice.

 

And I kept writing. I wrote essays and really bad books and blogs and anything I could get anyone to read. The Internet had come along by this point and now I had a platform. I built a crude website named after my cat Boo and I drove unsuspecting friends and family there to get feedback for my writing. Little by little, people I didn’t know began reading my writing, opening me up to the idea that you can find an audience outside of your known world. I started the process of learning what people enjoy reading. And I began writing for an audience that might someday buy a book filled with my words.

 

In 2006, I was working and writing and working and writing and working and writing. I was reaching a point of exhaustion – exhaustion borne of the idea that perhaps it would always just be me, working and writing around the clock without ever having an actual book for people to buy. In a fit of frustration, I decided to take an official break from writing and do some sort of creative cross-training. I signed up for an improv class at the local comedy club and quickly transitioned into stand-up.

 

So it turns out that stand-up is really just a variation on writing. You spend every waking moment of your life writing material. And laughing. To yourself. You write a ton of material and laugh to yourself and wonder if anyone else would laugh at what you just wrote. I loved stand-up. Unfortunately, almost all stand-up occurs late at night in places where people are drunk. I wasn’t very good at being part of that scene. I knew that stand-up couldn’t last long but I also knew that I loved writing humor for the sake of the punch line.

 

One day, in early 2007, it snowed on a Saturday. I was in the suburbs of Maryland, just outside of Washington DC. One Saturday a month, I did a workshop for people transitioning from crisis back to functioning. I helped them with legal issues and some of the other challenges that accompany hard times.

 

In Washington DC and the surrounding areas, even the mention of snow shuts everything down. And it was actually snowing pretty hard. So nobody showed up. It was just me, the social worker on duty, and a few others who tended to hang out at the center where we provided workshops.

 

The social worker pulled out art supplies and snacks while we hunkered down to wait out the snow. We drew flowers and houses and little stick-figure families. We weren’t artists, but we had snacks and crayons, so we were happy adult children.

 

I drew a stick-figure girl who I thought looked like me. She had a lot of hair and a really big purse. Then, in a moment of accidental creativity, I gave her a punch line. And I laughed because I always laugh at my own jokes.

 

Wprel141108
 

The next day, I scanned the girl with the punch line and emailed the image to my small but loyal following of readers. They liked her and asked for more. So I kept drawing her. And I gave her more funny things to say. I drew her every day. And I created  friends and family for her, mostly similar to my real life family and friends.

 

I created many, many cartoons for several years. I didn’t know how to draw, but little by little, I was learning. And I loved it. I loved my characters and my words and I loved the process. I posted cartoons wherever I could, paying attention to what people laughed at easily and what made them uncomfortable or angry.

 

Wprep141116
 

And then, one day, an acquaintance who worked at the Washington Post asked me if I’d like to talk to the cartoon editor. I said YES, of course. The cartoon editor turned out to be Amy Lago.

 

By the time I met with Amy Lago, I had read every word she had ever written about editing and listened to every podcast for which she had ever been interviewed. I knew as much about Amy Lago as I possibly could know, which really wasn’t much. Mostly, I just knew that she seemed really smart, really cool, really open to finding new laughs, and really down to earth.

 

I brought a collection of cartoons to Amy Lago at the Washington Post. She never looked at them while we talked. I have no idea what we talked about, but I remember thinking she was the most amazing person I had ever met and that she had the coolest job in the world, working at the Washington Post alongside such talented writers and creative, smart minds.

 

Amy and I met in April of 2008. She told me that May was her busiest month and that I may not hear from her for a while. I was excited because she had suggested I might hear from her in the future. I was also dejected because I thought she was lying about May being her busiest month.

 

I walked straight from her office at the Washington Post to a coffee shop on the corner and turned on my computer. I researched the month of May to see why in the world May would be a cartoon editor’s busiest month. I pretty quickly found references to cartooning award ceremonies and events and realized that May is the Oscars Month for cartoonists. I called my mother to report that Amy Lago had not lied to me and that we might have another date in our future.

 

I heard from Amy Lago after the cartooning Oscars (otherwise known as the Reubens). She liked my humor. She believed I would learn how to draw eventually. She thought that words were important and that my poor drawing didn’t stand in the way of my words, necessarily. She loved my characters. She asked if I could put together a package of cartoons that was more cohesive, with characters whose relationships were more easily identifiable and, for lack of a better word, “followable”… .

 

I spent the next month obsessing about getting a package of 40 cartoons to be as perfect as possible. I delivered them to her and she invited me to keep sending her cartoons by email. I sent her a cartoon every day for months. She told me what was good and what to change. I edited and revised every single cartoon. She helped to develop my ideas into a comic strip that made sense.

  Wprep141205

 

On August 12, 2010, I was at work when I heard that Cathy Guisewite had announced her retirement. I immediately called Amy Lago who had heard the news only a few moments before I had. By that point, I had hundreds of cartoons ready to go. I was ready to go and a female cartoonist was preparing to leave a void in the world of female cartooning. I wanted to help fill that void.

 

I was signed on to the Washington Post Syndicate in October of 2010 and my cartoon began running in February of 2011, on Amy Lago’s birthday.

 

I will never be able to describe how much work it took to develop a comic strip. I worked day and night. In addition to my day job, I worked on the cartoon compulsively. I said no to everything, including family and friends. I lived for the cartoon, thinking about material every minute of the night and day. I thought of so much material that a second cartoon was born, a “lite” version of the strip. That version became syndicated in February of 2012.

 

I still lawyer by day, although I have very recently transitioned to a less-stressful lawyering role that I perform mainly at home. Basically, I review legal files and write legal documents all day long.

 

At night and on weekends, I write and draw my strip. And I practice drawing every single day. I’m happy to report that I’m getting better at drawing. Maybe one day I’ll take a drawing class, but I’m not in a rush to get formal art education.  

  Wprel141111

 

Here are a couple of fun facts that really aren’t all that fun:

 

(1) I don’t read comic strips or cartoons because I don’t want to muddy my brain with other influences. A long time ago, I read Doonesbury and The Far Side to the point that I had memorized pretty much everything available from those creators.

 

(2) I write every single day, whether or not I want to. I write every single day because I have to or I feel all weird and crazy.

 

(3) I draw every single day, because I really enjoy drawing.

 

(4) I would continue writing and drawing cartoons even if I wasn’t syndicated. I love the vehicle of humor for communicating with other people.

 

(5) I’m still the biggest introvert in the world and I couldn’t get cabin fever if I tried.

 

(6) I’ve heard from haters who think I suck and should die. I learned how to ignore them since they don’t contribute in any way to my inspiration or motivation. And they’re rarely fun or funny.

 

(7) I love my followers and wish I could thank each one in person.

 

(8) I love Amy Lago in a way she should be seriously scared of.

 

(9) My top priority still is – and always will be – health insurance.

 

(10) I still have no studio. I live in Washington DC, where space is very expensive. I have a collection of folding tables I set up and take down every day, as needed. A tour of my studio would not be inspiring or impressive.

 

I hope anyone who reads my accidental cartoonist story takes away three things.

 

First, you cannot only do whatever you want to do, but you should be open to doing things you never planned or expected to do. It’s really cool to see where life takes you when you let it take you.

 

Second, anything worth pursuing is a total effing ton of work. There are no shortcuts and no such thing as overnight success.

 

Third, having a day job really helps to keep the lights on.


My first book should be out in February 2015.  I’m really happy to have a book I can give to my mother. I’m still not sure she gets what I do with my time.

 

– d

 

Read Reply All and Reply All Lite or follow along on one of these outlets:

 

www.bella-and-boo.com (art)

www.replyallcomic.com (cartoons) 

www.facebook.com/ReplyAllComic      





Twitter Q&A with Randy Glasbergen of Thin Lines & Glasbergen Cartoons

Glasbergen_3

 

Did you miss this week's Twitter Q&A with Thin Lines and Glasbergen Cartoons creator Randy Glasbergen? Catch up on the Q&A below: 

 

  

 

We'll be taking a holiday break from Twitter Q&As for the rest of this month. We'll return to live-tweeting on Friday, January 9 with Monty creator Jim Meddick! Tune in with: #AskJimMeddick 





BELLS, WHISTLES, LIGHTS

Over the years, a number of Sherpa creators have experimented with adding animation elements to their strips. The most avid practitioners lately have been Nighthawk and Stelbel, and today their feature CLEO & COMPANY offers my favorite strip-plus special effect so far.

 

 Merry Christmas!

 

Cleo and Company

 





The Best Part of Holiday Baking

What’s better than warm, gooey, freshly baked cookies dipped in milk? Eating the cookie dough raw, of course!

 

Frazz by Jef Mallett
Frazz by Jef Mallett

 

Thatababy by Paul Trap
Thatababy by Paul Trap
 
Adam@Home by Rob Harrell
Adam@Home by Rob Harrell

 

--Julie





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.

 

We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

Frank & Steinway  12-17-14

 

 

Mister & Me  12-17-14

 

 

 

 

 

12-17-14

 

 

 

 

Girth 12-18-14

 

 

 

Witt of Will  12-18-14

 

 

 

 

 Girth  12-19-14

 

 

 

 

H.I.P.  12-19-14

 

Onion & Pea  12-19-14

 

 

 

 

12-19-14

 



A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 

 

 





It's funny cause it's "truth"

When Jack Nicholson shouted "You can't handle the truth!" to Tom Cruise in the 1992 film "A Few Good Men," moviegoers were greatly moved by the intensity of the scene. If the same line was delivered today, however, Tom Cruise might instead say: "Actually, I've found a very concise and hilarious vehicle for delivering me the truth, one panel at a time. It's called Truth Facts and you can read it every day on GoComics.com!"

 

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Truth Facts is brought to you by the same Danish masterminds that created WuMo. It turns the fabric of our social decorum into swiss cheese-cloth, not just reading between the lines but translating what's written there into witty, irreverent observations that fit perfectly into stylish graphs, charts and pictograms. People who have already been reading Truth Facts might have noticed that the strip hadn't updated in a few weeks, but after working out a couple of kinks in the production pipeline, it's been restored to its once-a-day glory.

 

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Below (and above) are a few highlights from the past month. But I highly recommend starting with today's strip and working your way all the way to its launch earlier in the year.

 

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GoComics Staff Pick: Rose is Rose by Don Wimmer and Pat Brady

Acting like an adult is difficult. The struggle is real. Some days I still feel like I’m a carefree kid, others I feel like the rebellious teenager I once was and some days I’m almost comfortable with my normal adult self. That’s why I love Rose is Rose. The main character, Rose, is always bursting into other personalities whenever the opportunity presents itself. The creators of Rose is Rose, Pat Brady and Don Wimmer, don’t just show Rose acting like a little kid or a rebel in the comic, she actually transforms into a child or a biker depending on the situation.

 

For instance, Rose’s inner child emerges whenever she sees an opportunity to play and enjoy life in a way that most adults might find “immature.”

 

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Her husband Jimbo even loves to get in on the childhood fun every once in a while (my husband does as well).

 

 

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But then there’s also Rose’s rebellious side, a leather-clad biker chick with an attitude, who appears when Rose is feeling feisty and wants to go against the grain.

 

 

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I love that Rose is never ashamed of these different “personalities” that make up who she is. When the time calls for it, she flaunts her childlike playfulness or her wild rebellion in a way I admire. Rose is an adult, but she can still jump in puddles like a kid or live on the wild side like a teen. It makes me feel like my struggle with acting like an adult isn’t so strange after all – it’s just one of my many personalities!

 

 

—Rebekah Schouten, Production Editor 






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