Cancel Your Plans — It’s National Puppy Day!

If you need proof that we’re crazy for canines, look no further!  Dogs are featured prominently in dozens of our comics, as main characters, silent foils, comic relief and numerous other roles.

 

Today is National Puppy Day, a day dedicated to celebrating the puppies of the world and raising awareness for our four-legged friends available for adoption from shelters. Shelter dogs (and cats!) are a perfect choice for anyone looking to adopt a pet.


Even if you can’t adopt a furry friend right away, we hope you enjoy this roundup of some of our favorite funnypage pups.

1. Rover, Red and Rover

Red and Rover by Brian Basset
Red and Rover by Brian Basset

 

 

Although Rover can’t talk per se, Red is still privy to his innermost thoughts. From naps to fetch to running Red’s paper route, these two are inseparable.

 

Read Red and Rover here!

 

 

2. Sophie, Dog Eat Doug

 

Dog Eat Doug by Brian Anderson
Dog Eat Doug by Brian Anderson


 

Sophie is used to being top dog in her house, but things take a turn when her humans bring home baby Doug. Although originally apprehensive of the new addition to the household, Sophie and Doug quickly learn to appreciate each other’s unique talents.

 

Click here to read Dog Eat Doug!



3.
Will, Dogs of C-Kennel

 

Dogs of C-Kennel by Mick and Mason Mastroianni
Dogs of C-Kennel by Mick and Mason Mastoianni

 

Set in a sprawling animal shelter, Dogs of C-Kennel follows the “life in lockdown” of a pugnacious pitbull named Will and a motley crew of inmates (or should we say “inmutts”?). Will is the voice of reason in this chaotic yet hilarious strip.

 

Read Dogs of C-Kennel here!



4.
Bleeker, Bleeker: The Rechargeable Dog

 

Bleeker: The Rechargeable Dog by Jonathan Mahood
Bleeker: The Rechargeable Dog by Jonathan Mahood

 

Bleeker is to other dogs what an iPhone 6s is to a rotary phone. Yes, Bleeker knows how to sit, stay, and play fetch, but he can also download email and plan Skip’s homework calendar. There’s always a risk of him running out of battery — but he probably recharges faster than the average puppy.

 

Click here to read Bleeker: The Rechargeable Dog!



5. Poncho, Pooch Cafe

 

Pooch Cafe by Paul Gilligan
Pooch Cafe by Paul Gilligan

 

In the universe of Pooch Cafe, dogs and humans speak the same language — literally. This allows for some entertaining interactions where Chazz, Poncho’s human master, attempts to understand Poncho’s hare-brained and sometimes dastardly schemes, which seem to be endless in number.

 

Read Pooch Cafe here!



One more piece of good news for all you diehard puppy fans: On May 3, our publishing division is releasing Shelter Dogs in a Photo Booth by Guinnevere Shuster. This gorgeous photography collection captures the incredible personalities of dozens of shelter dogs, and also features a short biography for each canine.

 

 

Shelter Dogs in a Photo Booth by Guinnevere Shuster
Shelter Dogs in a Photo Booth by Guinnevere Shuster

 

Shelter Dogs in a Photo Booth will tug on the heartstrings of any dog-lover, and a portion of the proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Utah and Best Friends Animal Society!

 

Click here to pre-order your copy of Shelter Dogs in a Photo Booth.


Happy National Puppy Day! May all your puppy dreams come true.





GoComics Book Club: New Books from Andrews McMeel Publishing!

GoComics Book Club keeps you in the know about books for all ages, relating to your favorite comics and authors!

 

"Some Clever Title" by Bill Amend

 

 

Some Clever Title by Bill Amend

 

 

With a refreshing blend of humor and truth, FoxTrot reminds us that while a family might seem normal on the outside, there could be a perpetually hungry pet iguana on the inside. Amend delivers the hilarious, the cool and the hilariously uncool, all wrapped up in “Some Clever Title,” the 42nd FoxTrot book.

 

What exactly will you find in the latest and greatest FoxTrot collection?

 

Nerdy videogames? Check. Clueless dad? Check. Sister hogging the bathroom mirror? Check.

 

Get your hands on a copy of “Some Clever Title” here. Read FoxTrot here and FoxTrot Classics here.

 

 

"The Mother-Daughter Dance" by Cathy Guisewite

 

 

The Mother-Daughter Dance by Cathy Guisewite

 

The mother-daughter dance is a familiar waltz filled with ups and downs, twists, dips and twirls. The only question is, who’s in the lead?

 
The most beloved mother-daughter duo is back with a brand-new comic take on the difficult, wonderful, one-of-a-kind relationship between neurotic daughter Cathy and her caring, comforting, slightly interfering mother.


Insightful observations, amusing advice and comical proclamations are paired with Cathy Guisewite’s distinctive illustrative style. 

 

Find “The Mother-Daughter Dance” here. Read Cathy here.

 

 

"Fowl Language: Welcome to Parenting" by Brian Gordon

 

 

Fowl Language Welcome to Parenting

 

Parenting can be a magical journey full of bliss and wonder . . . if you're on the right meds. For the rest of us, it's another thing altogether. Fowl Language Comics takes an unvarnished look at the tedium and aggravation of parenting, while never forgetting that the reason we put up with those little jerks is that we love them so damn much. By poking fun at the daily struggles parents face, these cartoons help all of us feel less alone in our continual struggle to stay sane.

 

Order “Fowl Language: Welcome to Parenting” here. Read Fowl Language here.





GoComics Book Club: "Snoopy: Party Animal" by Charles M. Schulz

GoComics Book Club keeps you in the know about books for all ages, relating to your favorite comics and authors!

 

 

Snoopy: Party Animal by Charles Schulz

 

 

Spring is just around the corner, which means blue skies, sunshine and … melting snow.

 

 

Snoopy Party Animal by Charles Schulz

 

 

Good thing Snoopy has plenty of non-snowman friends! Everyone’s stopping by for a party in this new AMP! Comics for Kids Peanuts collection. Who’s on the guest list? Charlie Brown? Lucy? Linus? You betcha! Even some birds and bunnies join in the fun. But here’s the best part ... you’re invited, too! Just make sure you don’t forget to bring Snoopy his supper on time.
 


 

In this newest collection of Snoopy comics, the old gang is back at it with fun, adventures and even a cat. Good grief! Check in with all your Peanuts friends in "Snoopy: Party Animal." 

 

Don’t forget your party hats – grab a copy here! Can't get enough of Snoopy and friends? Read Peanuts from the beginning here.





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.


We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

All In Good Time  3-18-16

 

 

 

 

Batch Rejection  3-18-16

 

 

 

 

 

Don't Pick the Flowers  3-18-16

 

 

 

 

No Ambiguity  3-18-16

 

 

 

Painterly  3-18-16

 

 

 

 

 

3-18-16

 

 

 

 

 

The Gray Zone  3-18-16

 

 

 

 

 

3-20-16

 

 

 

 

Spectickles  3-21-16

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 

 





Shots Fired: Bill Amend vs. Stephan Pastis

March 21’s FoxTrot comic has been causing quite a stir in the comics world thanks to some white-hot comic crossover action!

 

FoxTrot by Bill Amend
FoxTrot by Bill Amend

 

 

FoxTrot creator Bill Amend took a swipe at Pearls Before Swine, and Pearls creator Stephan Pastis was quick to respond.

 

 

Bill refused to be intimidated.

 

 

Fans of both cartoonists have come out to show their support, and speculate on the outcome of the inevitable fracas.

 

 

 

Although we don’t play favorites at GoComics, we think we know which comic strip Jason Fox was referring to. The newest FoxTrot book, Some Clever Title: A FoxTrot Collection Blah Blah Blah, is available everywhere TOMORROW!

 

 

Some Clever Title: A FoxTrot Collection Blah Blah Blah by Bill Amend
Some Clever Title: A FoxTrot Collection Blah Blah Blah by Bill Amend

 

Although it’s the same Fox family we know and love, Bill Amend manages to make each FoxTrot entry funny and fresh. With a blend of humor and truth, FoxTrot reminds us that while a family might seem normal on the outside, there could be a perpetually hungry pet iguana on the inside.

 

In the interest of fairness, Stephan Pastis DOES have a new Pearls Before Swine book on its way. I’m Only in This for Me: A Pearls Before Swine Collection is available everywhere May 3.

 

We can’t wait to see how Pastis responds. Be sure to follow the excitement on social media!

 

In the meantime, order Some Clever Title here!

 

Pre-order I’m Only in This for Me by Stephan Pastis here

 

Read more FoxTrot here

 

Read Pearls Before Swine here





This Just In: TopatoCo Adds “Breaking Cat News: Shelter Cats” Poster

Shelter cats — particularly black cats, older cats, and cats with special needs — often get a bad rap. Prospective pet owners might avoid adopting cats from a shelter out of a mistaken belief that there’s something “wrong” with them.


The ace reporting team over at Breaking Cat News has released a special report on shelter cats seeking to “shed” some light on the truth. Through their exhaustive research, they’ve found that shelter cats are no different from any other cats!

 

(Click image to enlarge)

 

Breaking Cat News by Georgia Dunn
Breaking Cat News by Georgia Dunn

 

Cats come to shelters from a variety of places, and for many different reasons. Some are surrendered because their family can no longer care for them, and others have never had a family at all. They all have one thing in common: They’re ready to find a new home. That’s why they’re at the shelter!

 

If you want to show your support for shelter cats, the BCN special report is available as a poster from our buddies at TopatoCo. This lovely, attention-getting piece would look great on your wall, your friend’s wall, your veterinarian’s wall, or even the wall of your local pet shelter.

 

Buy the Breaking Cat News poster.

 

Read Breaking Cat News on GoComics.





New Comic Alert! At the Zoo by Zoe Piel

At the Zoo by Zoe Piel
At the Zoo by Zoe Piel

 

 

At the Zoo, a brilliant webcomic from the mind of award-winning cartoonist Zoe Piel, seeks to answer questions such as: What do chimpanzees say about us when we're not around? What happens when a penguin watches too much TV? What do you do with a lion who's scared of going to the vet? Find out the answers to all that and more... At the Zoo.

 

Read At the Zoo here!





The Peanuts Gang's Guide to Happiness

What makes you happy? Is it a good book? No lines at the grocery store? Hitting green lights all the way home?

 

Today, March 20, marks the International Day of Happiness, a day dedicated to the pursuit of a happier world. Tens of thousands of people from more than 170 countries are prioritizing happiness today by doing good deeds and spreading positive vibes.

 

Inspired by our pals from the Peanuts gang, we’re taking today to celebrate the simple, everyday things that make us happy.

 

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

 

Peanuts by Charles Schulz
Peanuts by Charles Schulz

 

Find your happy place with the rest of our Peanuts: Happiness is... collection!





Meet Your Creator: Jeff Weigel (Dragon Girl)

MYC_blog_header

 

The GoComics “Meet Your Creator” series brings you firsthand insight into the lives and careers of your favorite cartoonists. Each week, we hand over the keys to one of our talented creators, who share their inspirations, achievements, creative processes, studios and more! Read on to hear from this week’s featured cartoonist: Jeff Weigel of Dragon Girl

 

I began drawing comics about the time I learned to read. I can trace the very first comics I read to the spring of 1966 — the height of the Batman TV show craze. I fell for those Silver Age comics like a bowling ball in a black hole. As time went on, I realized I loved the artwork as much as the characters themselves. As credits started to appear in comics, I learned the names of the artists. Their draftsmanship and storytelling ability raised the bar for stories about guys who fight crime in their underwear. Anybody who read comics in those days has the same list of names that inspired them: Jack Kirby, Neal Adams, Nick Cardy, Jim Steranko, Curt Swan, Gene Colan and many more. (These guys taught every generation after them how to draw and tell a story. Modern comics artists owe those giants a debt far beyond the modest page rates they received for their hard work.)

 

In my teenage years, I absorbed a lot of information about comics and their history. That led me to discover the work of the three fathers of American adventure comics: Milton Caniff (Terry and the Pirates), Alex Raymond (Flash Gordon) and — most influential on me — Hal Foster. It was Foster who created the “big bang” of modern adventure comics illustration in 1929 with the Tarzan Sunday strip. But, his greatest work wouldn’t begin until 1937 when Prince Valiant appeared. Foster made Val the greatest show on the comics page for the next 40 years. His work is still the well I go to when I need inspiration.

 

So, with comics firmly imprinted into my DNA, I spent much of my childhood reading or drawing, trying to teach myself to create comics like those of my heroes. Studying art at college was inevitable, but in 1976, there were no BFA degrees in comics. The closest I could get was the graphic design program at the University of Illinois. There, I learned the craft of design, which became my fallback profession when breaking in to comics proved too tough a nut to crack. Commercial art also seemed like a reasonable compromise when I found out what starting page rates were in the shriveling comic book industry of the late 1970s. I decided to set my comics ambitions aside in exchange for the ability to eat regularly and live indoors.

 

 

JeffStudio
Jeff Weigel in his Studio

 

 

But shelving my comics ambitions wasn’t that easy. Despite my full-time graphic design career — first in New York (two floors above DC Comics’ office!), then in Lafayette, Louisiana, and finally in St. Louis, Missouri — comics still pulled me like a magnet. The problem: My timing was always terrible! I sent samples to comics companies during the early 1980s, when eroding distribution channels threatened to bring an end to the industry. In the late ’80s and early ’90s, direct distribution saved the industry, and independent comic book companies started sprouting like weeds. I tried to jump back in right after the wave crested — the comic book market collapsed and the independent companies that had been so hungry for new talent disappeared almost overnight.

 

Still, just before the crash, I met Gary Carlson, one of the guiding forces of a comic book anthology called Big Bang Comics. Big Bang had just hooked up with its new publisher, the industry upstart — Image Comics. Big Bang bucked the trend toward gritty, hyper-muscular superheroes. Gary and company were looking for creators dedicated to the kind of stories and art found in the good old Silver Age, and I was a perfect fit!

 

 

BigBangCovers

 

 

I did occasional work for Big Bang, becoming one of the main artists for Gary’s Ultiman stories. (Ultiman was a Silver Age Superman doppelganger, and my style was heavily influenced by the Man of Steel’s best artist of that era, Curt Swan.) More significantly for me, Gary decided the hero I’d created independent of the Big Bang universe would fit well into the anthology. Enter The Sphinx! He’s a hero I created as a kinder, gentler counterpoint to the cynical anti-heroes of the day. I went on to draw almost a hundred pages of Sphinx adventures; they all saw print in Big Bang over the next few years. They even earned me a nomination for the comics industry’s Russ Manning Award for the Most Promising Newcomer in Comics in 1998. No, I didn’t win. (Interesting aside: For a while, my closest claim to fame was that one of my Big Bang Sphinx issues was a prop on the pilot of the Fox sitcom Malcolm in the Middle!) To this day, my Sphinx work is well remembered by Big Bang fans, enough to warrant having all those stories reprinted in a soft-cover collection published by Pulp 2.0 in 2014.

 

 

SphinxCover

 

 

As nice as it was to finally be published, Big Bang did not bring in big bucks. In an attempt to find a more lucrative outlet for all the after-hours I spent at the drawing board (I was still a designer/art director by day), I tried my hand at children’s picture books. It seemed natural to create a mash-up of comics and picture books (hey, kids love superheroes, right?), and so Atomic Ace was born.

 

 

 

AtomicAceBooks

 

 

 

Atomic Ace is a superhero who saves the world by day and returns to his wife and son and ordinary middle-class home each evening. Ace’s work adventures are told in comic book panels that share the page with rhyming text and illustrations depicting his son’s daily experience as a typical kid in a typical elementary school—whose dad just happens to be a superhero. Occasionally, the dad’s and son’s daily activities overlap. Merriment ensues. Atomic Ace was enough of a success that a sequel followed the next year. Published work and royalty checks finally coexisted!

 

After the success of Atomic Ace, I found an agent who quickly sold my first children’s graphic novel to G.P. Putnam’s Sons. Thunder From The Sea is a real departure from superheroes: It’s an historical adventure of a boy on a British naval ship defending England from Napoleon in 1805. It was critically praised … and sold about as well as you’d expect, considering the subject matter. (Read: “Now out of print”.)

 

Through my agent, I struck up a partnership (and friendship) with children’s author and crazy-idea man Mike Spradlin. Mike had sold a novelty book concept to HarperCollins — a book of beloved Christmas carols with the lyrics rewritten about zombies! HarperCollins wanted to buy the book with lots of spot illustrations as part of the package. I was enlisted. It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Zombies: A Book of Zombie Christmas Carols landed on The New York Times Bestseller List in December of 2009, peaking at No. 16.

 

 

ZombiesCover

 

 

Shortly before my work appeared in a NYT bestseller, the great recession struck, and my graphic design career ended. I was laid off from the design firm where I’d been a designer/creative director for 20-plus years. The world had arranged for me to start over. I decided to finally give comics and illustration everything I had.

 

In the years since, Mike Spradlin and I followed the success of the Christmas zombies with a book of zombie love songs (Every Zombie Eats Somebody Sometime) and one of zombie nursery rhymes (Jack and Jill Went Up to Kill). Plus, we worked together on the kids’ picture book, The Monster Alphabet. Even with all these zombies and monsters on my plate, my love for comics was still calling. Plus, I had the urge once again to create a story from my own imagination.

 

Which leads us to the biggest project I’ve ever tackled: Dragon Girl.

 

 

DragonGirl

 

 

Honestly, Dragon Girl started out as a very different story of a girl raising dragons like livestock on a farm. When then Andrews McMeel editor Andrea Colvin saw it, she loved the artwork, but thought the story needed some rocket fuel. She pushed and pulled me in directions I hadn’t thought of (as good editors will do), and what emerged was a rip-snorting graphic novel adventure published in 2014, which folks are now enjoying, a page per day, on GoComics.

 

It is no exaggeration to say that Dragon Girl’s publication has been the fulfillment of a lifelong dream. As with every freelancer, the future is always an adventure, but I hope there are many more pages with panels and word balloons ahead. My next project is a nonfiction graphic novel explaining the science behind the Large Hadron Collider in CERN, Switzerland. It’s a collaboration with science writer Sara Latta, and it should be out from Lerner Books in 2017. In the meantime, I’m continuing Dragon Girl’s adventures and blogging on the joys of graphic storytelling for kids on my website. Keep an eye out for me — I’m not done yet. There’s more to come!

 

Read Dragon Girl from the beginning here. Follow Jeff on Twitter here.





Well, This is Awkward...

For introverts in an extroverted world, every day presents endless opportunities for awkwardness. From the terrifying prospect of dining alone in a restaurant to the mundane reality of navigating conversations, life is full of potentially awkward moments.

 

Instead of dwelling on those uncomfortable interactions from years ago (or this morning — that was embarrassing), why not celebrate them today, on Awkward Moments Day?


Nobody knows how quickly a situation can shift from “normal” to “awkward” better than our friend Lars, the eponymous Awkward Yeti. We’ve rounded up of some of our favorite clumsy, inelegant and cringeworthy episodes from The Awkward Yeti for your entertainment … and  secondhand embarrassment.

 

The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk
The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk

 

The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk
The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk

 

The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk
The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk

 

The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk
The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk

 

The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk
The Awkward Yeti by Nick Seluk

 

Looking for more awkwardness? Read more from The Awkward Yeti here.





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.


We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

 

 

Econogirl 3-11-16

 

 

 

 

 

Father of the Brood  3-11-16

 

 

 

 

 

3-11-16

 

 

 

 

Gravy  3-12-16

 

 

 

 

 

 

Batch Rejection  3-13-16

 

 

 

 

 

Candace 'n' Company  3-13-16

 

 

 

 

 

Dysconnected  3-13-16

 

 

 

 

3-13-16

 

 

 

Truth Be Known  3-13-16

 

 

 

 

 

And now...  3-17-16

 

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 

 





6 things to do on St. Patrick’s Day

Do you find yourself surrounded by green? Is everyone around you suddenly claiming Irish heritage? Do you have a sudden, unshakable thirst for Guinness?


You haven’t entered the Twilight Zone — it’s just St. Patrick’s Day. If you’re feeling overwhelmed, don’t fret! We’ve put together a list of 6 things you should do on St. Patrick’s Day to get the full Irish-ish experience.

 

1. Plan ahead.

 

The Duplex by Glenn McCoy
The Duplex by Glenn McCoy

 

 

2. Embrace the “luck of the Irish” and take a risk.

 

On A Claire Day by Carla Ventresca and Henry Beckett
On A Claire Day by Carla Ventresca and Henry Beckett

 

 

3. Eat something green — as long as it isn’t spoiled.

 

MythTickle by Justin Thompson
MythTickle by Justin Thompson

 

 

4. Accessorize accordingly.

 

Red and Rover by Brian Basset
Red and Rover by Brian Basset

 

 

5. Find the right end of the rainbow.

 

Arlo and Janis by Jimmy Johnson
Arlo and Janis by Jimmy Johnson

 

 

6. Take lots of pictures.

 

Beardo by Dan Dougherty
Beardo by Dan Dougherty

 

 

And, most importantly, remember to have a safe and responsible holiday!


Check out the rest of our St. Patrick’s Day comics collection here.





GIVEAWAY: Fowl Language: Welcome to Parenting

It’s only been a few months since Fowl Language waddled onto GoComics, and we can’t get enough of Brian Gordon’s witty, irreverent, and occasionally potty-mouthed characters.

 

Thankfully, our publishing division is releasing “Fowl Language: Welcome to Parenting,” the very first collection of Fowl Language comics. To celebrate, we’re giving our readers a chance to win their very own copy of this hilarious book.

 

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

 

This contest will end on March 22, 2016, at 12 a.m. CT. We will randomly select one winner and notify the winner via email on March 22, 2016.

 

Don’t want to wait to see if you win? Pre-order your copy here. And, read Fowl Language on GoComics right here.

 

The next giveaway will be announced on March 23, 2016 at 6 a.m. CT.





4 comics to inspire you on True Confessions Day

There’s no doubt about it – keeping secrets buried inside you is stressful! So, today, on True Confessions Day, save yourself some mental fatigue and embrace honesty. What’s the worst that could happen?

 

To get you started, here are four of our favorite comics dedicated to celebrating the truth, in all of its stark, unapologetic glory.

 

 

1. Truth Facts by Wulff and Morgenthaler

Truth Facts by Wulff and Morgenthaler
Truth Facts by Wulff and Morgenthaler

 

Truth Facts uses graphs and charts to communicate deep and occasionally uncomfortable truths in a simple and humorous format. From a bar graph of “The Greatest Regrets of Mankind” to a list of “The Five Most Frequently Shared Status Updates,” Truth Facts will make you laugh … and then make you reconsider your Facebook strategy.

 

Read Truth Facts here.

 

 

2. Deep Dark Fears by Fran Krause


Deep Dark Fears by Fran Krause
Deep Dark Fears by Fran Krause

 

Readers around the world submit their deepest fears and darkest thoughts to cartoonist Fran Krause, who then turns them into haunting, poignant comics. Deep Dark Fears is unsettling and surreal, but don’t be surprised if you recognize yourself in other people’s nightmares.

 

Click here to read Deep Dark Fears.

 

 

3. The Worst Thing I’ve Ever Done by Ted Rall

 

 

The Worst Thing I've Ever Done by Ted Rall
The Worst Thing I've Ever Done by Ted Rall

 

Think of the absolute worst thing you’ve ever done. Would you confess it anonymously to the world? The Worst Thing I’ve Ever Done takes the confessions of real Americans and presents them as serialized comic strips. Some end well, like the story of a woman whose prank gained her the respect of a coworker, but many of the stories are dark, violent and haunting.

 

Click here to read The Worst Thing I’ve Ever Done.

 

 

4. Tiny Confessions by Christopher Rozzi

 

Tiny Confessions by Christopher Rozzi
Tiny Confessions by Christopher Rozzi

 

What secrets lie behind those sweet, furry faces that we love so much? We all want to know what our pets are thinking. Tiny Confessions answers that question, sometimes in surprising ways. What does your dog really think of those nicknames you give him? How does your cat feel about her litter box?

 

Read Tiny Confessions to find out the answers.

 

Now it’s your turn. Go forth and confess!





4 "funny" facts to celebrate National Pi Day

If you haven’t thought about pi (the Greek letter, not the dessert) since high school, we don’t blame you. If, on the other hand, you think about pie (the dessert, not the Greek letter) constantly, we don’t blame you for that, either.

 

For those of you who fall into the first category, here’s a refresher: Pi represents the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter. Although its true numerical value is infinite and patternless, pi is usually rounded to 3.14. That’s why every year on March 14 (3/14), we celebrate National Pi Day!

 

Although the most common celebration involves — you guessed it — eating pie, some may say there are infinite ways to honor this mathematical wonder.

 

For our part, we’re sharing four of our favorite pi facts:


1. In 2009, the United States government endorsed Pi Day as an “engaging way to teach children about geometry.”

Frazz by Jef Mallett
Frazz by Jef Mallett

 

 

2. Pi has been calculated to more than one trillion digits past its decimal point, although only 39 are needed to calculate the volume of the universe.

 

WuMo by Wulff & Morgenthaler
WuMo by Wulff & Morgenthaler

 

 


3. Since there is no pattern, some people challenge themselves to memorize as many digits as they can.

 

FoxTrot by Bill Amend
FoxTrot by Bill Amend

 

 

4. Last year on Pi Day, at 9:26:53 a.m., the first 10 digits of pi were represented (3/14/15, 9:26:53). It was the ultimate Pi Day.

 

Working Daze by John Zakour and Scott Roberts
Working Daze by John Zakour and Scott Roberts

 



Hungry for more? We’ve got an entire collection of Pi Day comics for you to feast your eyes on right here.

 





New Comic Alert! Sticky Comics by Christiann MacAuley

Sticky Comics by Christiann MacAuley
Sticky Comics by Christiann MacAuley

 

Christiann MacAuley's Sticky Comics is a humor comic centered around relationships, technology, eating, hangovers, work, caffeine and other problems. Originally drawn on sticky notes in 2006, MacAuley continues to handmake the comic on paper. Sticky Comics is often funny, cute and irreverent. At times, it's a little depressing. But endearingly so ... Right? 

 

Read Sticky Comics here!





Meet Your Creator: Scott Hilburn (The Argyle Sweater)

MYC_blog_header

 

The GoComics “Meet Your Creator” series brings you firsthand insight into the lives and careers of your favorite cartoonists. Each week, we hand over the keys to one of our talented creators, who share their inspirations, achievements, creative processes, studios and more! Read on to hear from this week’s featured cartoonist: Scott Hilburn of The Argyle Sweater

 

 

The Argyle Sweater by Scott Hilburn 4

 

 

How many of us can recall the moment that influenced our career choice and, inevitably, shaped our life? I can.  

 

That moment, for me, came at the age of 7. I was in second grade, and my teacher had chosen a circus theme for our open house. So, for our first open house project, we were tasked with illustrating our favorite circus act. For me, that was an easy choice.  Some kids chose the lion tamer. Some kids chose the trapeze artist. Some kids drew circus animals. Not me. I was going to draw my favorite clown. But Kanye West hadn’t been born yet, so I settled for drawing my second-favorite clown – Emmett Kelly.

 

 

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As we were busy creating our masterpieces, my teacher, Mrs. Carlton, walked through the room to check on the class’s progress. She approached my desk just as I was putting the finishing touches on my magnum opus. Upon seeing my work, she stopped to offer a compliment, “Very good, Scott.” She was standing behind me so I couldn’t see her reaction, but I’m convinced she was clutching her chest with one hand while propping herself up with the other, and possibly even taking a moment to catch her breath and thumb through her Rolodex to search for any contacts she might have had at the Louvre.  

 

 

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Anyhow, the conversation that followed is one that would have a lasting impact on me:

 

Mrs. Carlton: So, do you want to be a cartoonist when you grow up?

Me: What’s a cartoonist?

Mrs. Carlton: You know, a person that gets paid to draw cartoons … like in the newspaper.

Me (mouth agape): Wha?  People get paid to do this??  How much do cartoonists make?

Mrs. Carlton: Hundreds!

 

That was it. That was the day – the moment – that I decided what I wanted be when I grew up: a jazzercise teacher and spandex model. Of course I was young and naive to the difficulties of breaking in to the very specific and highly competitive instructional exercise/dancewear scene, so, like many others in my chosen profession, I settled on being a cartoonist.

 

 

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Between then and now, depending on my age, stage of maturation and humor, I’ve read, enjoyed and admired a variety of comics and cartoonists. Early on, some favorites were Blondie, Snuffy Smith and Tumbleweeds. As a teen, I fell in love with The Far Side. Years later, my tastes evolved to include New Yorker cartoonists like Sam Gross, Tom Cheney and Leo Cullum, as well as the work of my friends and peers, Stephan Pastis, Mark Tatulli (Lio, Heart of the City), Paul Gilligan, Corey Pandolph (Barkeater Lake, The Elderberries, TOBY) and so many more.

 

 

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Read The Argyle Sweater here. Follow along on Facebook and Twitter.





Flashback Friday: St. Patty’s Edition

Top of the morning and happy Flashback Friday, comic fans! With March 17 just around the corner, we looked back through our GoComics pot o’ gold to find some of our favorite St. Patrick’s Day funnies from past years. Call it the luck of the Irish, but we came up with one hilarious haul of St. Patty’s memories:

 

Like this fashion faux pas from 2013: Who do you think wore it better?

 

Daddy's Home by Tony Rubino and Gary Markstein
Daddy's Home by Tony Rubino and Gary Markstein

 

And, this unparalleled display of St. Patty’s spirit:

 

FoxTrot by Bill Amend
FoxTrot by Bill Amend

 

The best use of the green theme we’ve ever seen:

 

Frazz by Jef Mallett
Frazz by Jef Mallett

 

Of course, no St. Patrick’s Day celebration would be complete without the classic short-people-are-like-leprechauns joke (apologies, petite fans!):

 

The Elderberries by Corey Pandolph and Phil Frank and Joe Troise
The Elderberries by Corey Pandolph and Phil Frank and Joe Troise

 

Still not pumped up enough for St. Patrick’s Day (can you ever be pumped up enough?)? Flashback to more St. Patty’s comics – View the entire collection here.

 

Cheers, to a safe and happy holiday!

 





COMICS SHERPA: EDITOR'S PICKS

This recurring LAUGH TRACKS feature highlights individual Sherpa strips and panels that for one reason or another caught the fancy of the aide de sherpa. It could be anything; the drawing, the writing, the humor, the coloring, that they tried something interesting, or that it's a new step for that particular creator.


We hope this quirky sampler will alert you to features you might not yet have noticed amid Sherpa's abundant, ever-changing, and eclectic mix, and that it gives Sherpa creators a modicum of helpful feedback.

 

 

 

3-8-16

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today's Trump  3-8-16

 

 

 

 

 

AJ & Magnus  3-9-16

 

 

 

 

Cleo and Company  3-9-16

 

 

 

Dumb Question / Bad Answer  3-9-16

 

 

 

 

Father of the Brood  3-9-16

 

 

 

 

Hubbel  3-9-16

 

 

 

 

3-9-16

 

 

 

 

Lili and Derek  3-9-16

 

 

 

 

 

 

All In Good Time  3-10-16

 

 

 

 

A complete list of all the Sherpa features can be found here.

 





GoComics A to Z, Vol. 28: Bleeker: The Rechargeable Dog

A weekly feature spotlighting new & unusual features on the GoComics A-Z roster

 

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Feature: Bleeker: The Rechargable Dog
Creator: Jonathan Mahood
Format: strip (dailies) large format (Sunday)
Frequency: daily

 

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The other night, I read "The Velveteen Rabbit" to my kids. In the book, a toy rabbit spends most of his existence wondering whether he'll ever be loved enough to be real. An early "Bleeker: The Rechargeable Dog" strip, in which Bleeker comes face-to-face with a real dog, reminded me of this poignant children's story. Except instead of longing to be like them, the way the rabbit does, Bleeker just scoffs and calls the dog a show-off. In spite of his quirks, bugs and occasional fried circuits, Bleeker (or BLKR501, for his IM pals) seems pretty comfortable with who he is, which is a good-natured robotic pet to a boy named Skip Smalls. "Bleeker" actually has a long history with GoComics, debuting on the site in 2006, with a five-year sabbatical from the site while it was syndicated by King Features. This January, the robo-pooch resurfaced on GoComics, and hasn't missed a beat since. Cartoonist Jonathan Mahood adds a lot of zip, movement and color to the strip, and wrings a pretty great range of expressions from the titular character. Especially fun are the new large-format Sunday strips, which feature the hapless robotic dinosaur, Refurb. Read more Bleeker: The Rechargeable Dog strips right here on GoComics

 

 

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